We Won’t Be Fooled Again

19 October 2016

This would be my subtitle for Steven Greer’s phone-delivered briefing of about a week ago that was just offered to his newsletter list and which I am listening to now.

Is Greer right?

Greer has a meditation background, as well as medical training. Thus, his life view is a bit eclectic, not even taking into consideration his views on ET.

He calls all beings not firmly attached to bodies “interdimensional.” This is a pseudo-scientific approach to the subject of spirituality that I consider “New Age.” Someone from the intelligence community (via Kerry Cassidy’s blog) has asserted that Greer is very much being played, just like everyone else out there talking about ET, and I take that assertion seriously.

His position, as I have mentioned before, is that ET exists on a much “higher” level than Earth humanity and therefore should not to be feared or even particularly mistrusted. That logic doesn’t make sense to me.

But because of this view, he is very sympathetic to the idea that all stories of ET dangers are installed by disinfo agents and are themselves part of a psychological operation to prepare the population for an open military advance into space and its expected ET opposition.

Greer is aware that we have already gone into space (secretly) with military-type craft, but is skeptical of the stories from people like Corey Goode who believes that we have traveled a considerable distance from this solar system and that some of our kind are aiding the Draco (“Reptilians”) in their missions farther away doing god-knows-what.

Other New Agers involved

It is odd to me that most of the voices I am hearing, other than Bill Tompkins (who is really old now), are involved in the New Age movement to a greater or lesser degree. That includes David Wilcock, who is basically sponsoring Corey Goode, along with a bunch of other lesser-known folks who are currently getting less coverage. Other somewhat prominent personalities of this persuasion are Courtney Brown and Simon Parkes.

Their work is getting heard, while other work is not heard or going largely ignored. I cannot escape the conclusion that this is by design. Someone wants the “spiritual opposition” to the Military-Industrial Complex to be of this New Age persuasion. Its ideas are even filtering into Psychology and elsewhere.

Simpler more matter-of-fact ideas and data ignored

Scientologists have gotten by for over 60 years now with a simpler more direct approach to the human situation and our relationship to ET and the physical universe that has been working consistently for people who have been using it.

Yet this material tends to be rejected by New Agers on various pretexts, instead of being met with interest or curiosity. Someone has been feeding New Agers with this narrow-mindedness, I think. Whoever that is, it is in their interest to keep other viewpoints out of the movement. This indicates to me that their goal is not greater workability or greater freedom, but simply a new dogma that will have broad appeal to the spirtually inclined.

If Greer is correct that the perceptions of Corey Goode were manipulated by the people running the program he was in to such an extent that he firmly believes things happened that really didn’t, then that argument could be turned back on him. Most involved with these projects are almost painfully unaware of this possibility!

I think your best approach if you are interested in these subjects is to seek out persons who seem very honest, then still assume that if their information is being allowed to get out widely on public communication channels, that it’s something someone wants us to hear.

If they are at one time both quite sincere and yet yelled down by criticism on the internet (to say nothing of TV or magazines) then they may actually have valuable information that simply does not support any of the current groups vying for power and control.

Rocks and Shoals

6 October 2016

Literally, rocks and shoals are some of the most common ways that ships come to their doom, particularly in the older times of wooden ships and no sonar.
This is also the slang term most sailors use for the Navy code of conduct, or any similar set of rules.

It’s not easy to take good photos from a train or bus.

But I wanted to share with you some of what I saw and wondered at during my recent travels.

Though there are areas on earth where one can go for miles in any direction without seeing any exposed natural rock, for a large part of the earth’s surface, that is not the case.

In gazing out at all these hard and craggy surfaces – as well as the soft places in between – I had to wonder: How did it get like this?

And so began a short investigation into the basics of geology as a preparation for sharing these photos and info with you.

I was most impressed by the sights I saw on my initial trip from Pullman to Boise, yet my photos from that ride are few and poor. I was more productive during my ride from Denver to Omaha on the train. There are enough scenes here to give you some idea what I was gazing at for hours during my trips back and forth across the West.

cliff face detail

This stone cliff appears to be eroded by water.

rock layers in cliffs

Here some layers seem flat while others are slanted.

green slope with cliff

Brush-grown slope beneath a harder upper layer, with starker cliff in background.

layered rock above river

Layering of rock is very evident above this river.

eroded rocky projection

Though this rocky projection is very eroded, huge areas remain bare.

According to the geologists, rock formation on earth started soon after the planet formed (soon in geologic time anyway). It was only one or two hundred million years after initial accretion of the planet when we started having bonafide surface rock.

After that, things get a little more complex. But it took a long time. As little as 35 million years ago, the earth’s surface was still changing quite a bit. The Rocky Mountains didn’t really start forming until 35 million years before that. What we see at about 70 million years ago is some major disruption that really gets the various crustal plates cracked up and moving relative to each other. Large parts of the ocean floors have formed since that time, and many of our most famous mountain areas did not exist before then.

One oddity is that the continent as we know it today was largely covered by water before the uplift that formed the Rockies even started.

And so the layers. In most cases, the lowest layers will be the original crust. If it were not for the great upheavals of the mountain-building period, those rocks would remain hidden below the layers that formed above them. But a combination of erosion and severe buckling has exposed them in many places. Above the lowest layer are layers created by wind, water and ice erosion, as well as volcanic activity. In the millions of years involved, the upper sedimentary layers have had time to become very hard, though not as hard as the bottom layer granite, nor the volcanic basalt, where that exists. So in an area once covered by a sea, you could have the bottom layer covered by sandstone layers, limestone layers (created by shell-forming living creatures), clay layers, which are basically eroded older rocks moved by water to new locations where they turn back into rock, and conglomerated layers deposited by ice. Then if volcanism occurred later, you might have a layer of lava over all that, or basalt squeezed into below-ground pockets. When volcanic rock forms in cracks in softer rocks, if that structure is then exposed to erosion, the softer rocks will wear away faster, leaving the harder rocks, often in rather odd shapes, or standing as “towers.”

jagged ridges near Las Cruces

These formations in New Mexico are incredibly jagged and probably created by ancient volcanic activity.

In the uplifting of the Rockies, all these different scenarios played out at different locations, leaving all sorts of odd formations, with combinations of newer and older rocks both exposed to view.

In Kansas City I saw a lot of limestone, both quarried as a building material and exposed in place in parks. That suggests the area had been covered by a warm and very alive sea in the distant past, and those layers subsequently uplifted to well above sea level.

I was also amazed at all the mountain meadows we went through on my trip to Boise. These were created mostly by glacial activity that started less than 3 million years ago.

mountain meadow and lake cascade

This Idaho meadow, full of pasture land and farm fields, is about a mile above sea level.

Dinosaur extinction event

About 75 million years ago, something happened on Earth that killed off all the dinosaurs. It killed off a lot of other species, too, but the disappearance of dinosaurs is the most notable. The current popular date for this is 66 million years ago. This also corresponds to when the Rocky Mountains were forming, which means a lot of tectonic activity.

The most persuasive scientific hypothesis is that a very large asteroid hit the planet at that time.

Hubbard also mentions an event that occurred around that time, but chose to keep the data confidential, as it had little bearing on the more general subject, but was needed for a particular processing step.

Another person named Eva Zemanova (Czech) has reported recalling an event that happened she says 80 million years ago. It involved a very highly evolved ET group that was headed somewhere else but experienced a malfunction in their ship and were forced to land on Earth.

The big question is what caused the malfunction of their ship.

She believes there has been some sort of higher intelligence presence on Earth at least since that time. So what both these findings suggest is that even 80 million years ago, other than “natural” factors were having an impact on events on Earth.

And that’s what makes the whole question of exactly what unfolded here all those millions of years ago so interesting.

my train by a river in a canyon

Yes, I really did take a train ride across the country last month, and it’s really hard to take a photo of your own train while you’re riding in it!

Goose Poop

6 October 2016

geese in park Omaha

Geese feed on a lawn in Omaha downtown park.

We’ve all seen Canada Geese stop over at some local lawn on their way North or South. But these weren’t Canada Geese, and they acted like they’d been living in this park for a while. These geese, in fact, look more like domestic geese.

I don’t remember geese of any description living in parks. But when I visited the favorite park of my boyhood, Nicholl Park in Richmond California, Canada Geese were obviously living there.

geese in Richmond park

“Wild” geese living in Richmond.

What’s going on here?

Google “urban geese” or “goose poop” and you will find plenty of reading materials on this subject. But they most all say the same things.

What certain sites (such as Cornell’s) will tell you is that the U.S. government started a program in the 1930s to re-establish the Canada Goose population which had dwindled considerably due to hunting. They did this with captive birds. These birds did not know to migrate, and they didn’t migrate; they stayed put. These are the birds filling our city parks and causing most of the problems we are having with goose poop, noise, and aircraft interference.

They are safe in cities because no one can hunt (with guns anyway) in cities.

I wondered after getting back home if no one was using the Nicholl Park lawn because of all the goose poop in it. And that probably is a factor. There was a lot of it, and per all the materials I’ve read, it’s not very healthy to be in contact with it.

As it turns out, the real key here is lawns. These birds love lawns, and will seldom settle anywhere other than a grassy field.

Odd coincidence

Oddly, last night I attended an event titled “12th Annual Palouse Basin Water Summit.” We listened to the usual local speakers on the subject of the Palouse water supply, plus we had one international speaker, Maude Barlow, a Canadian water activist.

Right now, the Palouse gets most of its fresh water from underground sources (aquifers). Agriculture and industry are not significant users of aquifer water in the Palouse. Even so, the aquifer water levels have dropped over 100 feet since we have been pumping out water for human uses.

The most attractive and realistic way that most residents can reduce water use is to switch to gardens around their houses that require little or no irrigation. This is no panacea, but it got a lot of attention at this meeting because it is a fun and interesting way to reduce domestic water consumption.

Most residents are already aware of low-flow toilets and shower heads, waiting for full loads before washing clothes or dishes, and generally being stingy with water. These are all part of “going green” and have gotten a lot of attention in many urban areas because many urban areas have had water shortages.


Lawns have reached a kind of iconic status in the American and European psyche. Anybody’s dream house has a lawn in front of it, possibly quite a large one. All those photos of our little kids playing on the lawn at home or in a park…it seems an essential part of life.

Yet lawns are atrocious water hogs. They require tremendous amounts of water to keep them green, but will tend to drain off excess water, rather than pull it into the soil. They are like many of our crops that must be irrigated to survive. And so, though grass can be very green, lawns are not very “green.”

What’s odd about me going to this conference then wondering about goose poop is that lawns are related to both issues. Lawns. Odd.

There are still some municipalities (Orlando, Florida is cited by Wikipedia) that mandate front lawns. In more hip communities, the problem is more likely to be front no-plants-at-all. But people in general are gradually coming to realize that the more soil that is covered with plants that will help it soak up, rather than reject, any precipitation that comes its way, the more pro-survival that soil will become for all involved.

So, the answer to both goose poop and water over-use is getting rid of lawns and replacing them with more natural gardens or vegetable gardens.

I have recently posted a lot of photos of urban parks. They all have lawns. You might say, “What would a park be without a lawn?” To which I would reply, “A lawnless park.” I have absolutely no sympathy for golfers, either. None.

I have not begun to even scratch the surface! After we de-lawn, we are going to have to confront re-forestation. And that involves our current methods of agriculture, both mass crops and grazing animals. I’m not sure how far we can take this, but I know that the ideal scene would be to phase out our impact on the surface ecology almost entirely.

I wanted to show you a picture of Bird Hills, but couldn’t find one, so here’s Discovery Park in Seattle.

discover park seattle trail to beach

My ideal park.

Food and Travel with Anthony Bourdain

4 October 2016

After a second exposure to Bourdain’s shows during a layover at the bus station in Portland, I wanted to write a bit about these shows.

For some reason, his Parts Unknown show on Libya, which dates from 2013, was being re-broadcast that day in Portland. I also saw his show on Istanbul (Turkey).

Some time ago I’d seen at least one of his shows featuring Chinese foods.

On this more recent occasion, I’d just finished eating a very decent hamburger at the new café at the Portland bus station, and had also gone through 3 brochures printed for travelers which – who couldn’t guess – all focused on food.

The show on Libya was blatantly anti-Gaddafi, portraying him as a hopelessly misled and ruthless dictator. The more basic fact is that Gaddafi was anti-West. If you look at what the West has done during its period of dominance over the planet, and where Gaddafi lived (in an Arab nation), this attitude would not be unexpected.

The Istanbul show was very unsure about the “goodness” of Erdoğan, and sympathetic to the Kurds. Erdoğan, for his part, has been vacillating in his support of NATO, particularly after learning that they may have had something to do with the recent coup attempt.

The West’s War of Ideas

The tactic that has been followed by the West in its conquest of the planet is to portray its opponents as “anti-freedom” rather than anti-West, and to fight against them on the basis that they are “bad” rather than that they are simply enemies. Over the centuries of European expansion into other areas of the planet, this tactic has taken many forms. It was particularly convoluted when it turned against other Europeans, such as the Germans before, through, and after WWII. In many times and places it was eventually backed away from, such as in the American colonies and later in countries like India. But this only meant that the intention to hold sway over these areas became more understated, or covert.

What is really exactly happening on the planet remains subject to debate, as no facts seem clear enough to be totally persuasive. But I find the whole argument regarding how the media (print, radio, TV, internet) has been subverted by these European-centered interests to be very persuasive. Thus on a secondary (if not primary) level, shows like Bourdain’s become propaganda vehicles for the West’s viewpoint on life and politics.

Travel and Food

The Western idea of a “successful” person is one who can enjoy travel and food in his older years, if not during his entire life. Anthony fits this definition and thus becomes a role model (winning valence) to be imitated. His neo-liberalism then comes along as part of the package. It is a basically synthetic attitude that the entertainment industry likes to develop in its celebrities to convince us that there are no higher awarenesses worth pursuing. This limits us to the lesser games of liberal-versus-conservtive, or progressive-versus-traditionalist.

Until I was introduced to Hubbard’s work, I was convinced that the game of life was limited roughly as stated above. My only problem was that the managing groups were obviously lying to us about some things, and I could not understand why. There also seemed to be a lot more violence going on than was really necessary.


To go where you want and eat what you want are considered the ultimate attributes of freedom in the West. If this means you kill a few basically innocent people along the way, that fact has no basic bearing on the overall facts concerning how the game of life is limited. Or so we are being told.

What Hubbard taught is that a higher-level game of life has been operating for a very long time, and that our managers have an interest in keeping us unaware of this.

At the higher levels, management as we know it becomes unnecessary or irrelevant. If we were to aspire to these higher levels, what would our managers do? The most entrenched among them are hopeless to the point of total unknowing on the possibility of moving themselves up to a higher level of game. Thus, if some of us were able to achieve this state, it would appear to them as a threat to their very existence (which it would not actually be). So, they reactively – if not consciously – oppose any trend towards an awareness of the higher levels of the game. And their “enemies” have become anyone with an interest in working at those higher levels.

Thus their “enemies” become anyone with a serious interest in higher spiritual abilities. That includes all the followers of the more ancient teachings – mostly the aboriginal peoples of this planet – as well as various renegade groups within the framework of monotheism as well as beyond it, and their attempts to re-invent religion or spiritual practice into something more workable and true to genuine human aspirations.

The handling for these “enemies” has been to invent various pretexts for going to war with them and killing them off. That this has not in fact been very effective does not seem to phase the managers; they have no other “solution” to this “problem.”

The Role of Aesthetics in Propaganda

Aesthetics are needed to give the basically low-awareness propaganda of the managers of the West an appeal to their target audiences, those who seek a higher awareness. You can just lie to the others and they will accept it. To convince this target audience is a little more tricky.

Anthony’s shows are examples of this use of aesthetics. They are very artfully shot, and very carefully assembled. All aesthetic aspects are given attention, including the artfulness of the food itself, and the places being visited. The sound track, the music; they are all carefully put together for every show. This type of treatment has always been a “hook” to help pull in the seekers of higher awareness.

Do ordinary people who have lost interest in higher realms watch Anthony’s shows? I doubt it. But a lot of people who have been asking questions and playing around with spiritual ideas do watch his shows, I bet. These are people still on the fence, unsure of themselves spiritually. There are a lot of them and they are important politically. Liberated, they are capable of getting a lot of good done. Captive, they are capable of preventing a lot from getting done. The old-line managers want to keep these people on their side. And the new-line groups want to add these people to their ranks more than any other type of person.

The Future

What we all face, of course, is the future. What Scientologists, and many others to a lesser extent, know is that we will be in that future. We may or may not forget who we were before. We may or may not have the same adventurous approach to life we chose this lifetime. But – good or bad – we will be there. So we are intimately connected to the future on a long-term basis, not just in the context of one lifetime, or the lifetimes of our children.

The materialists and fence-sitters are unsure of this at best, and totally unaware of this at worst. They are turning away from the whole subject of responsibility, even if their own future experience is at stake. They can’t allow themselves to believe that they could be that responsible.

Some posit this as a “war.” But that is only true on the lower levels. The truth of the situation is that those who want to “ascend” cannot do so simply by “getting rid” of those who don’t want to. In the short term, it is highly advisable to minimize one’s exposure to such people (one reason I don’t watch television as a habit). But in the long term, we will have to bring them all along with us, or they will return later to try again to pull us back down again. So, it would not be incorrect to characterize this as a “struggle.” LRH has described it as “a game where everyone wins.” Well, they know that there are always losers in a game. LRH posits that the loser in this case is the “bank” (that portion of the mind that produces non-survival ideas and actions). But most people are as yet unaware that this exists as something separate from themselves. That problem defines the first hurdle in this struggle.

On the other side of this struggle lies a future that is difficult for most to even imagine. It involves a knowing and causative separation from the physical world, including the physical forms of life (biology, etc.), yet the probable indefinite continuation of the physical world in some form. It involves a knowing conviction of our own immortality without necessarily totally turning away from the various “thrills” of physicality. It involves ideas and experiences which we have – in theory – never experienced before, which would be entirely new.

For me right now, the most important thing that future holds is an abiding respect for truth; an end to all the fouler forms of secrecy and deception; and a chance for great happiness for every being who desires it.

Could Anthony and his show exist in this future? It probably could. But it would be minus the lies and pretense that encumber it now. After all, there are a lot of “parts unknown” left in this universe! We can’t all visit all of them ourselves. Or could we?

San Francisco

28 September 2016


Yesterday I went to San Francisco. My major destination was my church. To get there I walked from the BART Embarcadero station through the Financial District. I returned via Chinatown, hoping to find a shop selling the wooden “trick” boxes that I had loved when I was a child. Thus, I missed all the South of Market (SoMa) renewal projects (which were just beginning when I left the Bay Area in 1982 and continue to this day). Above, a view up at the Transamerica Pyramid, built in 1972.


With the growth of electronic banking and securities-based banks, the Financial District has been transforming. Though the old buildings still stand, they are being put to new uses. Illustrative of this trend is the Pacific Coast Stock Exchange building.


Built in 1930, by about 2001 the building was no longer housing any stock trading activities. FOr about the last ten years it has been a fitness club with a New Age angle for upscale Millennials.

The old Transamerica Building, at the triangle corner of Columbus, Jackson and Montgomery, was converted to its present use by my church in 2003.



I remember Chinatown in the early 1980s as a run-down and forlorn ghost of what I remembered from the 1960s. However, the process of urban renewal (sometimes know by the less-than-complimentary term “gentrification”) has probably helped to keep Chinatown alive. Though the center of old Chinatown is considered to be Grant St., I spent most of my time on Stockton. The northern part of Stockton is lined with food shops. Here is sold fresh produce and meats – especially seafood – cooked meats such as ducks and chickens, and dried foods of an enormous variety.


Many of these shops are very orderly, such as the one pictured above. All the signs are in Chinese; these food shops are for use by the local community or people who speak (read) Chinese.

The south side of Stockton is now lined mostly with upscale gift shops. This used to be the area my parents would take me to find decorated wooden “trick” boxes and other toys, and to gaze at the amazing jade and ivory carvings. This is still a major tourist destination.

These shops now carry mostly more expensive items – for adults, not children – and some cheap toys. One shop proprietor who I asked about this told me she thought that those old toys required too much hand work, and could no longer could be made inexpensively. She showed me her inventory of little hand-beaded purses. She told me she can no longer get these purses – these are her last ones.



The Bay Area Rapid Transit system began construction in the 1960s and was first opened in 1972. The cars use off-standard train trucks (the four-wheel assemblies you see on all trains) on steel rails fastened to a concrete bed on rubber shock-absorbing pads. In this system, electricity is delivered to the trains via a “third rail” which is actually up to one side of the ground rails. Most newer systems I have seen use overhead wires for this purpose, and use standard gauge rails and trucks. Per the Wikipedia article on BART, use of the wider rail gauge has increased maintenance costs. Standard American gauge rails will be used on at least one future extension.

I remember the trains being noisy when I rode them 35 years ago. But now they are VERY noisy.  And this is after a noise reduction program, completed last year. Before then, noise levels of 100dB, which is 8 times as loud as the 70dB “average,” were being reported at many points in the system.

Per Wikipedia this is because train trucks have straight axles (both wheels rigidly attached to each other) and so always screech, or slip, around curves. I can find no talk on the internet of redesigning trucks so that each wheel rotates independently. Straight axles are the tried-and-true design for coping with the weight bearing requirements of train trucks. Almost no one has considered that passenger train trucks should be designed differently than freight train trucks because of the sensitivities to noise of human cargo. A few light rail systems use special trucks with rubber wheels. But in most places the cost of these must have been considered prohibitive. It is too bad that so many have to suffer due to economic considerations. An urban train ride could be a delightful experience. Cost-cutting measures have reduced it to near-torture on BART.

Park Pictures Monday 26th

26 September 2016

berkeley-20160926-174-strawberry-creek-parkI wore out my feet walking around Berkeley and Richmond yesterday (in newish shoes) but went back out today to track down more places in Berkeley that I had been associated with.

The overall impression left from this walk – and most of my other walks – is a city in transition. While the disenfranchised leave messes everywhere, the forces of “progress” march on, replacing old buildings with new ones, or sometimes renovating.

There are still MANY buildings and houses that date from earlier than 1950, but there is also new construction everywhere.

I don’t consider most of my photos from this walk particularly aesthetic, but here are a few. The one above is of Strawberry Creek Park. It is a small flatlands park that has been there for some time. However, while I was living here I had no reason to ever go over to the area that park is in, so don’t remember it. Many of the old places I visited today I don’t remember. I had never visited them when I lived here, I guess.


I include a photo of Ashkenaz here, as it was an important place for me. I learned social dancing there, and met my friend Susan there.  In 1996 the club’s founder and proprietor David Nadel, was shot dead by a drunk he had earlier ejected from the club. A wall of ceramic tiles (visible above the car) was erected in his memory. David was always around when the place was open at night; I remember him well.

I went over to see the place where Susan used to live. At the end of the street (cut off by the BART when it was built) is a neighborhood garden, pictured below.


On the route back to Berkeley, along a walk/jog/bike path made when the BART was put in, is Cedar Rose Park. Again, this is a simple neighborhood park with grass and a children’s play area.


Though these parks are nice for travelers, and important to the community, in Berkeley I did not need them as much as I needed parks in other cities. Berkeley is full of little food stores and cafés; I never had a problem finding a place to sit or getting something to drink. Some cities have financial or office districts which are like cultural deserts, or sprawling industrial or business areas where the pedestrian seems to be left out of the picture. Not Berkeley.


Park Pictures Sunday 25th

25 September 2016

This is really just an excuse to upload some of my photos…

berkeley-20160925-020-indian-rockIndian Rock, near the traffic circle at the bottom of Marin (a very steep street that was originally designed for a cable car), is one of the oldest and least-changed parks I visited. Given the general public nervousness about dangerous play equipment in parks, it astonishes me that this rock remains open to public climbing. There are some chiseled-in steps, but no hand rails. If you fall off, you fall. I used to terrify my father running up and down this rock, as I saw a young man do when I visited today.

The Berkeley hills are full of little parks. This is one example at the corner of Arlington and Coventry.


The tree featured here is very climbable – I should know!

One of the biggest “parks” in the Berkeley hills is one I never visited – Sunset Cemetery. I took a lot of photos there, as the huge mausoleum (building where remains are interred in crypts instead of buried) rather fascinated me. But one thing I thought I would never see in Berkeley in a cemetery was a deer!

berkeley-20160925-092-deer-in-cemetaryFrom the Berkeley Hills I moved on to Richmond to find Nicholl Park.

On my way I ran into this small park and playground in a recently-built neighborhood of townhouses. Its centerpiece was a large willow tree.


Nicholl Park was created in 1926 by the WPA (Works Progress Administration – a “New Deal” project to give the unemployed something to do). When my parents took me there in the early 1960s, the park included an aviary (famous for its peacocks), a full steam locomotive that children could climb into, and huge swing sets in a sand lot.

Someone hurt themselves playing on the locomotive, and a fence was put around it.

Sometime later, the aviary was taken out, then the locomotive and the high swings. Today the geese love this park, but on a hot Sunday afternoon, I didn’t see many people in it.

Under these lovely big trees, near where the aviary was located, is a skateboard area – the most popular part of the park now.


The platform where the locomotive once stood now serves as a planter and seems to be favored by the resident (or visiting?) geese.


The tall swing sets have been replaced by much safer (but at this visit, unused) play equipment.


Things do change. But somehow a very well-to-do neighborhood in the Berkeley Hills has managed to retain one of the most dangerous pieces of “play equipment” I have ever seen in any urban park, while the economically disadvantaged city of Richmond has all but lost what was once a thrilling and interesting downtown park.

Notes on Cities and Urban Parks

24 September 2016


Boise and Salt Lake City

Pictured is a statue located in a small park in front of the capitol building in Boise. It depicts a Nez Perce chief giving directions to Lewis and Clark.

A discussion of the human fallout that goes with the West’s legacy of “rugged individualism” and expansion by forced takeover is called for at this point. Not everyone in these parts was raised by a family with the old cowboy spirit, and taught the survival skills necessary to make it on their own in a challenging environment. Others lose their way in their youth, or join the military and get busted up during a tour of duty. Still others have immigrated into the area from other parts of the world and are used to different ways. Among all these people, some make do, while others become a bit “not right in the head” and then even more of a burden on society. Bus stations, being open odd hours for their passengers, and having bathrooms, attract such people.

In Boise, it was a young guy in a wheelchair. One leg was pretty obviously messed up. He entered and exited the station many times while I was there, often following younger women in, hoping to get their attention. At night he put out some blankets over by the arcade machines (one intoning “crazy taxi…” over and over again – very annoying) and went to bed.

Such people are a little unnerving. They know they are not welcomed, and often don’t say much. When they do, oddities in their communication normally are evident. They make the legitimate passengers uncomfortable, and signs are usually posted saying they are not allowed to come in. But customers and staff have a hard time enforcing the rule. They are obviously so pitiful, and the inclination is to give them some space and leave them alone. It’s not, however, good for business – or society. It’s time we learned how to do something more positive for such beings.

Meanwhile, I got on a bus to Salt Lake.

It rained all the way to Salt Lake City. It was a late night run and we seemed to be following a storm. It was still dark when we came into the “intermodal hub” downtown. The rain had subsided and I was able to find my way to a ticket machine, buy a one-day transit pass, and board the light rail blue line into town. That trip was my entire tour of downtown Salt Lake. I found my motel – a cheap but poor one – they found a room available early, and I got some extra rest before visiting the local Scientology organization.

As I traveled through the city, I got the impression that older expansion plans had been put on hold. I used a “streetcar” that has no street to run in! Though a shopping center at the far end of the line (near the present location of the Org) is up and running, the rest of the area remains run down. This is a poorer but proud community named “Sugar House” after an historic sugar factory-turned-prison that used to be in the area.

As a side-project, I sought out parks in many of the cities I visited. They provide a nice place to rest in the shade for a few minutes, and usually have drinking water. There are parks throughout Slat Lake City, but I didn’t get a chance to visit any of them.

With my thoughts on the problem of reviving these communities – and the planet – I boarded my train to Omaha (after an almost four hour wait) after sharing the station with a bunch of great folks…and one totally mad lady who showed some interest in indulging in non-sequitor conversations with some of us.


Omaha is an interesting place.

The train arrived there about 5AM. The sun wasn’t going to rise until about 8AM. The train station was going to close at about 7AM. So I put on my pack and went out to walk at about 6:30.

I knew where I was going. I had looked at the area with Google Street View as well as having printed out an ordinary map. But I had no idea where I was going to find breakfast at 6:30 in the morning!

I walked up 10th to Jackson, the street where the bus station is located. And what should I see? A place called “Cubby’s Old Market Grocery” (601 S. 13th) with its lights on and doors unlocked. A real grocery store and deli in a downtown location! Unusual. The food wasn’t good, but it was food.

I had a hard time keeping my bearings straight downtown. A jogger asked me which way the river was, and I pointed in the wrong direction! Omaha is on the Missouri River right across from Council Bluffs Iowa. Lewis and Clark passed through here. Both sides of the river downtown have large public spaces built into them. The Omaha riverfront park included a bridge to help people on foot get around all the busy streets in the area, and a walkway with sponsorship signs from all imaginable AFL-CIO unions.


A large plaque concerning the Lewis and Clark episode there and at Council Bluffs was also prominent. Some other structure that had been a part of this area was under demolition. This was a theme I found common to many cities I visited: Out with the old, in with something else.

Downtown Omaha was full of public spaces. After visiting a sprawling life size bronze sculpture depicting a small wagon train, I found several other park spaces before getting to the riverfront. Here is a portion of the sculpture:


And here, a downtown mall (per the earlier definition of mall – an outdoors promenade or walking area):


Oddly, I thought, the world headquarters of ConAgra (a very large packaged foods company) was located in this area. Per Wikipedia, the company had earlier threatened the city that it would leave town unless a downtown historic district was cleared out to make way for a new company headquarters building and grounds. Then last year, the company announced it would move anyway. It was not clear to me that the move had taken place.

The lake on the ConAgra property doubles as a public park and walking/jogging trail. When I visited, a portion of the trail had been overrun by noisy (and messy) geese.


But signs told us not to bother the wildlife, so we all walked around them. They were seemingly oblivious to our presence, another oddity for “wild” animals.

Per Wikipedia, Omaha was founded by speculators from neighboring Council Bluffs in 1854. (As a comparison, Pullman was established in 1881 by three original landowners, as “Three Forks,” later re-named after George Pullman, the inventor of the Pullman railroad car and owner of the company that manufactured them). By historical standards, all the towns I have visited so far are actually quite new. Thus “historical” is a very relative term in most of these towns.

By mid-afternoon, Old Market was bustling with tourists. Most of the shops are restaurants, with various artsy gift shops inserted here and there. I found an actual coffee house/bakery (Aromas/Bliss) with WiFi at one point. It was very new to the area, and not like the other coffee houses in Old Market but more like Starbucks. I was glad to find it, as I needed to connect to the internet to reserve a room in Kansas city, as I’d changed my bus ticket to get there earlier.

Kansas City

Though Kanasas City is closer to the old South, it officially only dates from 1853 – much the same age as Omaha, and established in much the same way. It was not the traditional site of an earlier settlement, but more-or-less built up from scratch using land purchased by investors/speculators.

I did not spend much time exploring the city, but in the late afternoon I walked around a bit and found “Hyde Park.” It was a fairly classic city park – green lawn with scattered large sprawling trees. It had once been a golf course, established by some people from Scotland.


Cicadas sounded intermittently from several of the big old trees – a familiar Midwest summer sound. The park continues south out of the Hyde Park historical neighborhood (full of large, fancy homes) past an old school that is being renovated to a newer lawn area with a playground in it.

However, the neighborhood near the Org, only a few blocks away, was decidedly dilapidated. So it is clear things are a bit out of control in this city, as is not uncommon across America these days.

For me the great wonder of Kansas City was its transit terminal. The old Union (train) Station had been remodeled, with the city Metro and Amtrak given space inside. (Greyhound is still across town at its older location.) The remodeling includes a huge event hall where the old train waiting area used to be, a “Science City” attraction for kids, like the Exploratorium in San Francisco, shops, and a restaurant. There is a walkway connecting all this to the Crown Center hotel and indoor shopping mall across the street. This turns the place into an upscale area that the homeless are more or less unable to penetrate.

I walked through all of this, and found a shop offering a nice but inexpensive carrying bag that I needed to supplement my day pack. Of course I’m sure some local citizens consider this whole project a bit invasive (and exclusive). But it’s not like these areas aren’t public. They just aren’t plebeian.

I might note at this point the marked lack of availability of fresh raw foods in many of these downtown areas. Except for the small grocery store I found in Old Market – that from its hours obviously serves the locals – it is very difficult in the average downtown to find an apple or banana or some plain yogurt or some chilled juice. Some of these things appear in the convenience stores that are now attached to most gas stations along most bus routes. However, train travelers using downtown stations may not be able to easily find such a place.


Albuquerque is somewhat of a different story. It is located just a bit north and west from the center of the state, at an elevation of about 5,300 feet. It was established under its current name by the Spanish in 1706, as part of the Camino Real (Royal Road) trade route to Mexico. That makes it much older than most Midwest cities, yet still much newer than the cities of Europe, Asia or Africa.

It developed, however, much as the rest of the Midwest developed, except for its huge Spanish-speaking population. In this city those of Hispanic ethnicity outnumber the Anglos. However, ruling groups throughout the Americas have always had some sort of European connection, so this Hispanic majority does not equal Hispanic prosperity.

Though the city is on a river (the Rio Grande – I never saw it) it occupies a basin of over 200 square miles. Thus “urban sprawl” has occurred, made possible by automobiles and pursuit of the American Dream of living in a single-family home. I walked through just a few of the neighborhoods closer to downtown and they seemed endless. Trees are rather sparse here – particularly big trees, and the big streets are for cars, not people. The sidewalks are narrow and poorly-kept, with no places to sit at many bus stops and no parks along most of the streets I walked. I had to go into a neighborhood to find a park. And somehow they managed to build this park without including a drinking fountain. I was quite amazed.


I found two very nice and trendy restaurants downtown (Tucanos – a chain, and Sushi King) and there are probably many more. I can only guess that lots of young office workers in the nearby government and financial office buildings, along with some tourists, keep these businesses going. There are homeless in the area; quite a few. Their presence makes it harder to keep the place looking nice. There was also new construction happening downtown.

Albuquerque’s transit center is fairly new and OK. But accommodations for travelers are sparse – as if this were some sort of tradition (which it may be). As I have mentioned elsewhere, the transit centers always attract the homeless and that becomes a service problem for the customers. Only Kansas City has solved this.

I’m sure there is a lot I’m missing involving the ruling classes / working classes culture clashes in all these cities. In the U.S. the ruling class is supposed to be a working class. In the cultures that colonized the Americas, though, this was not the case at the time of those colonizations. And the old ruling classes have never died; they just wear business suits now in an attempt to blend in better.


To get to Roswell from Albuquerque you have to climb out of the Mesilla Valley (part of the upper Rio Grande, at 3,900 feet) and get through a narrow ridge into the White Sands area (4,300 feet) then across the Sacramento Mountains and down into the High Plains where Roswell is located (3,500 feet).

The significant thing to me about Roswell is not the UFO crash that happened near there, but the reason UFOs were being attracted to that area. The Roswell Army-Air Field (later, Walker AFB) housed Strategic Air Command planes – including those used to bomb Japan in 1945 – during the time of the UFO crashes. Thus the area was a central point for the rollout of our nuclear capability following WWII. This is what attracted ET attention, and was one reason they were doing overflights in the area.

The main thing I did in Roswell was visit the UFO Museum (officially the International UFO Museum and Research Center). It was created by two people who were involved in the 1947 incident, and has become a major attraction in the town. It currently has a nice building and an interesting exhibit, but the materials are dated and some of the displays are a bit over-theatrical for current audiences and also in need of repair or replacement.

It is definitely the opinion of the museum founders that the real facts of the 1947 incident were covered up by official BS for some reason. They have probably survived by not taking the issue much further than that, though many (including myself) think it’s time to get honest about the whole variety of issues that are connected to the UFO issue.

I went to the library in the museum and asked for their Sanni Ceto books. They had two, one autographed by the author with a special drawing and inscription in her home language. I asked the librarian if she had heard of Sanni Ceto; she had not. Sanni is the only being available to us who can tell the ET side of this story. I think she should be better-known, at least by those who work at the UFO Museum! Another girl there remembered Sanni’s visit to the museum (about 2005), describing her as “autistic.” So this whole problem is most likely related to the fact that most Americans do not believe in reincarnation (or past lives), which makes Sanni’s story hard for them to accept. I consider this a much bigger problem than the UFO cover-up, as this is something we are all touched by every day.

Before leaving Roswell, I walked out in search of their parks, and found some. They are in the northeast of town, located on one side of the Spring River that flows through there (it was channelized by WWII POWs). The open part with picnic areas is called Loveless Park.


There is a continuation of this park to the east that is fenced in and serves as a zoo. It’s called Spring River Park. It was not open when I visited.


Of all the cities I’ve visited so far, Amarillo seemed under the most pressure.

Even the workers at the bus station had poor communication skills, and their security guard could not prevent oddball homeless persons from coming in and bothering passengers, many of whom weren’t in much better shape.

Per previous searches into the Amarillo scene, I found they had recently experienced a bad drought followed by heavy rains. This had caused a bark beetle infestation which had damaged many local trees, making a nearby park look like some sort of battle zone. It was too close to sunset after I’d finished dinner at a local Mexican restaurant to check the park out myself; I am depending on images I saw using Google Street View for the above description.

The bus from Roswell got into Amarillo a couple hours before sunset, and the next bus did not leave until 3 in the morning. This was therefore going to be a 10 hour wait, the longest I have so far experienced. It was rough. The station security guard and some passengers were watching TV to pass the time, and there were two different shows running on two different TVs at the same time. I read from my book for a while, but couldn’t stay awake enough to do that the whole time. The shows preferred by the security guard were some totally ridiculous cartoons full of off-the wall social commentary and very little else. I also saw one episode of “Anger Management” which is a totally ridiculous “comedy” about dysfunctional therapists, and another show about two guys trying to take care of a baby. These shows were largely concerned with sex and unworkable “funny” attitudes people have about it. Pretty bad. There were also stories of more police shootings during the news breaks. This adds up to a lot of psychological pressure and wrong whys on a public that don’t know what’s really going on or what they can do about it.


In the alternative realities community, Denver is known as one of the hubs of deviant political activity in this country. The motif of its airport is one of the most bizarre I have ever seen (via photos posted online) and many questionable characters are accused of having special secret meetings there, at places like the Brown Palace Hotel downtown. However, on the surface, it’s just Denver.

Their transport hub has recently been upgraded, with an underground bus and light rail “concourse” which has displays that list arriving buses like flights are listed at airports.

They have a downtown street (16th) that has been modified to allow for wider pedestrian spaces and two narrow vehicle lanes. Only special no-fare buses are allowed to go back and forth in the vehicle lanes. Beyond that, many people other than tourists still use cars to commute, as in most U.S. cities.

I did not have time to explore Denver much. The cowboy tradition, though, was much in evidence there.

As of this posting I have arrived in Berkeley. I will write something about Berkeley later. It has changed a lot since I was last here (1982).

Into the mountains

17 September 2016


It was a cold morning on the Palouse. 36 degrees per the sign at Dissmore’s.

Pullman is at a latitude of 47 degrees and elevation of 2,300 feet.

My destination is Boise, altitude is 2,700 feet, at latitude 43.6 degrees. To get there we must cross several ranges of high hills and reach the foothills of the Rockies. This is the first time I’ve traveled this route.

After arriving at Lewiston Idaho, we start our ascent by following the Clearwater River upstream to the east. However, we don’t stay long with the Clearwater, instead turning south towards White Bird pass ( 4,200 feet). Preceding the pass is a large flat area. On the down slope from White Bird is our lunch stop, Hoots. The area below Hoots is an historical site where the local natives tried to defend their lands against the incursions of the U.S. government in their quest to make the West “safe for democracy.” (Battle of White Bird Canyon – will it ever end?)

Next we find the Salmon River and head upstream. This is a resort area and has been for some time. Above there, following the Little Salmon, the geologically new western foothills are extremely craggy. Much of the exposed rock is glassy and gleams in the morning sun. There is evidence of grazing here, common in many national forests, even though the steep slopes seem like they’d be difficult for the cows.

We stop briefly in New Meadows, one of the high meadow areas (3,900 feet) on the way to Boise. Next is McCall (5,000 feet), a rather upscale resort area on a lake (Payette Lake), and near the high elevation limit of our trip.


Following the Payette River, we begin our descent towards Boise. Now the granite outcroppings are more weathered, signalling geologically older mountains. There are also limestone/sandstone outcroppings here and there, and areas of sandy soil, evidence of a once-huge body of water (the Western Interior Seaway of 100 million years ago).

Some time before we reach Boise, larger human settlements become evident. This is the top of a very well-settled inner valley that extends southeast for hundreds of miles.

SpaceX snafu and other news

3 September 2016

snafu: American slang popularly thought to originate during WWII, but possibly derived from an abbreviation used earlier by Morse code operators on telegraph circuits. “Situation Normal; All Fouled (Fucked) Up” has a sarcasm attached to it which may have not been originally intended, but certainly contributes to the modern meaning of “snafu.”

The first of September was an interesting day…

Many were attracted to the explosion at the SpaceX launch site in Florida. An article run by Veterans Today suggested that an “attacking” object was detected in the video of the event in the frames immediately prior to the beginning of the fireball.

I downloaded and looked at the video from about 0:50 to 1:12 in slow-motion and frame-by-frame (a hidden feature of Microsoft Media Player) and saw anomalous fast-moving objects three different times directly before and in the fist second or so of the explosion. The first time, an object seems to launch from behind the middle tower, curve up toward the rocket, then away to the right. The second appearance spans only about six frames and shows an object pass all the way across the scene, just behind the rocket. The explosion starts when the object is about 1/2 way to the rocket. Very soon after the explosion starts, another object (or the same one) appears in the lower left and swiftly moves towards the upper right.

Thus, we definitely have one or more “UFOs” associated with this event and perhaps causing the explosion.

Some think the Israeli payload was not as “humanitarian” as it was made out to be, and that someone with the ways and means knew this and decided to terminate the launch.

Simon Parkes appears with Kerry Cassidy

Kerry didn’t know about the SpaceX explosion when she called Simon for an interview focusing on upcoming events. He told her about it. But they did not discuss it much as it had just occurred at that time. Kerry had suspected that something might happen to a SpaceX project based on Courtney Brown’s “Time Cross Project” results for August, which predicted some sort of explosion resulting from an object falling from the sky. The August event seen by the Remote Viewers matched much better with a Russian cruise missile attack on targets in Aleppo, Syria.

What the Remote Viewers have been noticing in events such as this one is evidence of things being deliberately caused which are presented to the public as “accidents.”

But in this interview Simon spent most of his time on his main theme, which is that an old power faction centered in the City of London (the same one, basically, named by LRH in his 1967 Ron’s Journal talk) is becoming desperate because it is losing control. Several other commentators are telling this same story. It is unclear exactly who or what is pushing them out of power. Some think this is basically the BRICS block. But because of ET involvement in all this, the situation is probably not that simple.

In any case, Simon says he is putting away some extra food and water and does not plan to travel in October. He thinks a disruption of the electronic banking system may occur quite soon, and that we should all prepare for it.

Time Cross for September is released

Meanwhile, Courtney has released the Time Cross Project sessions (done mid-August) relating to September. All the viewers saw various forms of civil unrest. The location appears to be the Middle East, and that would be no great surprise, as civil unrest there is the new normal. However, Dick Allgire saw events that he thought would have world-wide repercussions.

These sessions include 4 viewers, two young and two older. The first younger viewer calls herself “PrinCess Jeaneé” and the second is Aziz Brown (Courtney’s son). It’s great to see some younger viewers take on these targets. They are not easy targets!

What chance for the ways of peace?

As I mentioned in my series on Battlefield Earth, peace is not a subject often dealt with in literature. It is, perhaps, seen as boring. What LRH tried to make a case for in Battlefield Earth was that peace could be exciting. I believe history has demonstrated that societies prosper in times of peace. This would be one huge reason why Suppressive Persons would prefer continuous war. We are all hoping that those who take over from the City of London see things differently. It would be great for Earth to calm down a bit, as our challenges are far from over, and we could use more time to prepare for them. Our next great challenge, as I see it, is ET.

The ETs I am concerned with (and so are many others) are basically biological societies that have developed an array of assistive technologies that boost their abilities to use force to control others. Although they have deadly weapons, we are assuming they are thinking in terms of using psychological and physical force here on Earth towards the goal of enslaving us – perhaps without our being totally aware of the situation. Similar techniques which have “worked” for the SPs of Earth come under the heading of Covert Hostility. We might assume that ET is better at these techniques than our SP Earth brothers are.

So the challenge becomes to spot these techniques and defeat them before they “work” on us. This requires training and is the principal reason we need more time. We will probably not get as much time as we would like. Fortunately, this training program is already well underway. Perhaps there will be enough trained people to move the situation in our favor. If you want to help, go to our Volunteer Ministers website and get started.