Archive for March, 2014

Spring News

31 March 2014

More photos of the tiny white roadside flowers!
They’re back! They are a crucifer, probably an alyssum that most would consider a weed. I took my camera out to “the vacant lot” on a brisk, sunny Sunday afternoon for these shots.

flowers look like snow

They look like snow on the ground from a distance…

drift of tiny white flowers

Get closer and you still can’t really tell..

mat of tiny white flowers

Yes, they are flowers!

huge field of tiny flowers

From an ant’s eye view, they look like a huge field!

flowers in gravel

Basalt gravel adds a little character.

defiant little flower

They defiantly grow where no plant has grown before!

Remote Viewing News

Speaking of defiant, Courtney Brown, who runs the Farsight Institute single-handed, has released his latest project, after much fanfare in an attempt to get more attention. This project concerns the building of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Yes, ETs and cloned rock miners appear to have been involved. The stones (up to 80 tons in weight) were hovered into place with the manual help of human devotees. The sessions include the data that another ET group came in and introduced monotheism to the area. The “magic” of the pyramids had evidently waned by that time, and the people, finally realizing they were free to leave the area, did in droves.

Courtney is convinced that data gained from Scientific Remote Viewing can change the planet for the better, but he has come to understand the grim realities of the situation: He has only two remote viewers he can rely on; the technology is dying out. You need a group to push a new technology forward, or it will die as an esoteric curiosity. Data of this variety is being pushed into the “alternative media” with the hope that it will never be picked up by the mainstream. The “intelligence” community seems very involved in this activity. They also work hard to discredit and/or ruin anyone who has something truly promising or revealing to offer. The strategy is to make the “alternative realities community” – also known as “New Agers” – look like a bunch of kooks so no one who wants to be known as “serious” or “legitimate” will touch them. Works pretty well most of the time.

One year on the Palouse as of end of January!

tiny flowers with bicycle

My bicycle celebrates its first year in service.

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Microscopes

23 March 2014
microscope

American Optical “Spencer Sixty” lab microscope

When I was young I had a microscope. I didn’t use it very much. Just enough to see some little creatures swimming around in pond water, look at some insect parts, and things like that.

But when I saw a lab microscope last year at Palouse Treasures, being sold for a tenth of what it was worth, I had to get it. Now someone who really has a use for one has expressed an interest in it. So I thought I better take some photos of it and put up an article.

Known History of the Microscope

According to the historians, Dutch lens makers (for eyeglasses) were the first ones on earth to put together microscopes, back in the late 1500s. This may be true.

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (1632–1723) is a famous name in microscopy, pioneering the use of this instrument as a research tool in biology.

As a Scientologist I am aware that all earth technologies had earlier versions elsewhere. The process here on earth has been one of re-familiarization, not “first art,” for the most part.

Optical microscopes served us well until the 1930s, when some electronics guys were able to throw together some instruments that magnified things much better than optical microscopes could. Meanwhile, optical lenses continue to be used for so many different purposes it would be difficult to list them all.

Parts of a Microscope

parts of a microscope

Parts of an optical microscope.

I don’t particularly want to get into a whole thing on optics here. The point was to just get some photos of a microscope up on my blog, with a few of the basic technical terms.

microscope business end

objectives, stage, focus knobs, lamp

Perhaps one of the more fascinating things about this instrument, and many others like it, is the solidity of its design and the obviously precision machining that went into many of its parts. In many modern machines, the technique that goes into their construction is mostly hidden under a cute or simply practical cover. Unless you open things up, you won’t notice all the precision parts that go into the things we use (I am thinking of computer disk drives). But with this microscope, the machined surfaces are right out there to look at.

Extending the perceptions

The microscope is an example of a long list of tools designed to extend human perception. The fact that we find ourselves in a situation where we must construct sophisticated machines to extend the abilities of our bodies (which are rather sophisticated biological machines in themselves) is quite ironic. We had – in theory at least – the full range of perceptions to start with. We ended up “inside” a very limiting body for reasons best left for researchers such as LRH to explain.

Only a very few people on earth are beginning to experience the range of perceptions that are available to a being when it operates exterior to a body. There have even been techniques developed to rehabilitate lost perceptual abilities, including the ability to sense things like magnetism and radio waves. I am very interested to see where this process of rehabilitation will take us!

Java – diving in

6 March 2014

What it takes to write a program – briefly?

Back when I was using DOS [the Disk Operating system sold with most PCs (personal computers)], there was a program included called QBasic. You ran the program and there was a window (a DOS window) where you could write your own little programs. Then you would run them from inside the QBasic program.

This was a very simple functionality for writing software. However, we still follow this fundamental pattern. The program you write software in is now called an IDE – Integrated Development Environment. You develop software by writing and editing code. An average biggish program will make use of many code libraries. These all have to be in places where the IDE can find them. As the functions implemented by your application become more complex, the connections between the various different parts become more numerous.

What does it take to write a program? I takes an IDE, or something like one.

Java

The Java language and approach was created in the 1990s by a computer scientist at Sun (Stanford University Network) Microsystems. By 2007 it had become completely open-source (all code freely available to the public). In 2009 Oracle, a huge software company, bought Sun with the promise to keep Java open source.

The Java approach was to create a language that would be the basis for programs that could run on any operating system. This language is VERY widely used. Its users include huge companies like Boeing, governments, the military, robotics competitions and programming hobbyists.

NetBeans

NetBeans is Oracle’s IDE for Java. It started as a student programming project in Prague (a beautiful city in central Europe). It was purchased by Sun in 1999, and was made open-source soon after that.

One reason it is called NetBeans is because Java is very widely used to create applications that run over networks. Network applications are more complicated than desktop applications because they require communication between computers and sharing resources among multiple users. Of course, Java can also be use to create desktop applications.

Here is a screenshot of a sample NetBeans project:

netbeans example

This shows two views of the same project. One view shows the actual folder structure of the project, and the other shows the project in a way that should assist a developer to work on it.

Note that the number of different parts that make up this “simple” project is quite large. This is rather daunting for the beginner!

What I wanted to do

Years ago I learned that a game controller, usually called a “joystick” after the control stick used in helicopters and jets (a rather base play on words – common among pilots), was extremely simple to make. It seemed like an ideal way to add some hardware knobs to any sort of control application. I wanted to have a piece of code that would allow me to use human-controlled joystick positions in my software applications.

In the “old days” of DOS, this wasn’t too hard to do. You could write commands that took data directly from the computer’s hardware interface.

But “modern” computers, in an attempt to become much more versatile, no longer access hardware directly, but communicate to the hardware through “drivers” that are little pieces of software that make some particular piece of hardware look to the operating system like a generalized, or generic, piece of hardware. So the operating system only has to worry about “printers” and “keyboards” and “game controllers” instead of all the different specific models that exist. And the hardware manufacturer is responsible for providing drivers for different operating systems that they want their hardware to work with.

Windows, in particular, has been through a lot of changes in how its hardware drivers work. This is partly because it is trying to anticipate future hardware innovations and make operating systems that will be compatible with them.

Thus, talking to an old-fashioned DOS joystick on a Windows computer is now basically impossible. You need an intermediate piece of hardware (thankfully not too expensive) to make the “legacy” joystick look like a USB game controller. Then you can choose one of several ways of talking to the USB game controller — your joystick.

I was not getting anywhere finding code examples that worked in my Microsoft IDE (Visual Studio – I learned to use it at Seattle Central Community College), so I thought I might try Java.

My first choice for a Java IDE was Eclispe. This is an open-source IDE developed by IBM. It is about 10 years younger than Java and is in fact written in Java. I had heard good things about it including the fact that it is very versatile through the use of feature “plug-ins.”

Here is a screenshot of just a portion of the application. It is really very similar to other IDEs. However, the best code examples I could find were developed using NetBeans. Each IDE uses its own internal folder structure. So you can’t really take a NetBeans Java project and just copy it over to Eclipse and have it work fine.

eclipse-example

Success!

If you have a USB joystick, on Windows 7 you can go to the Control Panel, choose Devices and Printers, and you should find listed your game controller (if it’s plugged in). You can right click it, select “…settings” and then click the Properties button. It should bring up a little window that graphically shows the joystick, sliders and buttons on the game controller, and the graphic will change as you move the controls or press the buttons. This is exactly what the code I found implements using Java. It’s a very interesting piece of code, and it is comprised of (count them!) three major parts and about 15 different functions. That doesn’t count all the stuff that Java takes care of for you. So this function is not as simple as I’d like it to be, but at least I finally have some code I can look at. (This is available in a zip file called JInputJoystickTestV2.zip from http://theuzo007.wordpress.com/2013/10/26/joystick-in-java-with-jinput-v2/ .)

More on project folders

It took me a while to learn to use folders to organize my code projects – even the ones I did without a real IDE (I learned to create PHP applications without using an IDE). I finally decided on a standard folder structure for my PHP projects, and it has helped me to “throw together” an idea, because I can just start by copying a similar project into a new folder.

Below is a little illustration of someone’s website folders. The “eng” stands for “English.” The other folders are similar to the ones I use. One for HTML pages, which may be “static” or contain code in them. One for images. A website can have a LOT of images! One for styles, which are files written in a language called CSS – Cascading Style Sheets – that describe how a website should look, but contain no content. And one for “js” – JavaScripts. JavaScripts are not really related to Java, and are a little controversial. They are basically little programs that download with a web page and run in your browser. They can therefore potentially do bad things to your computer. They are supposed to only do things to your web page, though, and now most browsers are built in a way to help ensure that JavaScripts only operate on the document being displayed. Still, I don’t like to use them. I prefer to rely on built-in browser functionality to do things on a web page.

And with that little digression, goodbye for today!

website-example