Archive for December, 2013

Power Down in Pullman

6 December 2013

At about 9AM this morning (a Friday) power went out on the factory floor at SEL in Pullman. I thought some might be interested in a few of the technical implications of such an event.

Part of the plant contains equipment that is very problematic if it loses power unexpectedly. That part is protected by a local generator run by a diesel motor, and power to it was restored immediately.

However, that left a large part of the building without electricity.

Cold weather!

The weather here for the last few days has been very cold, never getting above freezing. The low this morning was about 1° F (-17 C) with an expected high of 18. This weekend it will get even colder before a “warm” front moves in next week and causes more rain or snow.

Air temperature and water vapor holding capacity

Very cold air can hold practically no water vapor, whereas hot air can hold a lot. This means that “humid” cold air is actually very dry. If freezing air with a relative humidity of near 100% were heated 40° F it would become very dry air, with a relative humidity of perhaps 25%. Our frigid air currently has a relative humidity of around 70%, which translates to less than 10% at a comfortable room temperature.

Making an ESD safe factory

Electrostatic buildup is a much bigger problem in dry air than in humid air. In a modern electronics factory, maintaining a humidity level of about 40% is an important part of minimizing damage to parts as they are assembled onto boards and the boards get assembled into equipment and tested.

Special equipment is installed to (usually) add water vapor to the factory air to keep it ESD (electrostatic discharge) safe. When our part of the factory lost power, the humidifiers went off, and the air started drying out. By lunch time the humidity had dropped to about 10%. We had lost our ESD-safe work environment. The factory was halted and workers sent home, as it will take about 2 hours after power is restored (which happened around 1PM) for the humidity to be brought back up to a safe level.

“Safe grid” no buzzword

That’s what you call a “negative economic impact” from a power outage.

About 4 hours of production time wasted, even though the power was restored in the middle of the day.

If the outage had lasted longer or been more extensive, it could have knocked out building heating and caused a real human problem, as has been caused by winter storms in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Most infrastructure on this planet has not been built with the idea that weather or other environmental hazards would ever be a major problem. Though this seems a bit fanciful at this point, it is where things stand. If things get real bad on the planetary surface, much of our infrastructure could be destroyed, even if our bodies survive. Evidently, something other than sustainability was on the minds of those who designed and built most parts of our current environment, including the power grid and the generating stations and substations that go with it.

The more sustainable portions of our infrastructure are usually kept secret, as you can imagine them being overrun if some sort of panic ever happened on the surface, if everyone knew where they were. This gives those who do know a short-term advantage. But it’s only short-term.

This planet, as a human society, will eventually pay for the shortsightedness of ourselves and our leaders in creating an environment where instant gratification is much more important than long-term survival. It would be one thing if we took this risk with full cognizance of what we were getting ourselves into. But it didn’t go down that way.

Many of the survivors of the last great cataclysm on earth carried forward lifestyles of (by our standards) severe poverty in order to preserve some semblance of a balance between short-term and long-term survival.

Certain groups took another approach, thinking that material technologies could protect them from any important threat. Though these groups effectively “conquered” the “primitive” groups, our sense of balance was also lost.

We now possess knowledge that could change the future outlook considerably.
We know:
1) We are actually eternal spiritual beings playing the “meat body” game as a sort of pastime.
2) We are not alone in this universe. Many other societies exist out there that are struggling with the same problems we are struggling with.
3) Physical technologies exist or could be developed that would far surpass what we now have and could, for all intents and purposes, solve the survivability problems of meat bodies if we wanted to. Contacts with those other (“ET”) societies have made us aware of this.
4) For the first time, spiritual technologies are also available to us that could enable us to gain full control over our own criminal tendencies and so solve our greatest survival problem, which was: Destruction from within.

Thus a “New Era” is possible on earth and many other locations, if we decide to embrace these various technologies and use them together to improve conditions and move the whole game up to a higher level. If we grab for the material technologies and neglect the spiritual ones, our game could dive to new lows. It’s really all up to us whether “power down” becomes a permanent condition or a thing of the past.