Posts Tagged ‘wildflowers’

April Showers Bring May Flowers…

12 May 2018

…at least, that’s how it works here in Sacramento.

jasmine bush

Jasmine bush growing in my backyard.


columbine flowers

Columbine in garden just down the street.


catalpa tree

Catalpa tree next to the school.


Dietes - African iris

African iris – genus Dietes – in a school parking lot.


bottlebrush flowers

Bottlebrush in parking lot of a suburban shopping center.


flowering tree

Flowering tree in the neighborhood.


evening primrose flowers

Evening primrose – genus Oenothera – spilling onto the sidewalk.


privet bush flowers

Privet bush in Howe Park.


honeysuckle flowers

Honeysuckle in Howe Park.


wild iris also known as flag

Wild iris – also known as Flag – in Howe Park.


lobelia flowers

Lobelia in native plants garden.


yarrow

Yarrow in native plants garden.


lupine flowers

Lupine. This is near the volunteer center at William B. Pond park.

These next three are the most profuse flowering plants in American River Parkway. You can find fields full of these plants. The major larger plant in these areas is the Elderberry – see previous post.

vetch flowers

Vetch photographed in Michigan in 1971.


cow parsnip flowers

Umbels of cow parsnip flowers.


yellow rocket flowers

Mustard family plant – probably yellow rocket.

The following plants can be found along the bike path in large quantities. They enjoy full sun, but will also grow in shady areas.

blackberry flower with bee

Blackberry flower being visited by a bee.


thistle flower

Thistle.


hawkweed

Hawkweed grows closer to the ground.


wild rose

Wild rose – not that common in the parkway.


california poppies

California poppies.

You may have to leave the bike path (as I did) to find these plants. They are better known as woodland wildflowers, and the bike path runs along the edge of the riparian (riverside) woodlands, but not so much through them.

st john's wort

St John’s wort.


mint

A less conspicuous mint.


mint-related plant

A mint-related plant favoring shady areas.


fleawort

The homely plantain, now called fleawort to reduce confusion with the banana. Genus Plantago.

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Bike Trip East

12 October 2017

I took this trip on the 24th of September. Got busy and almost forgot to write about it!

yellow asters

These hardy yellow asters thrive in an otherwise very dry landscape.

I have taken the American River Bikeway (also known by other names) west into Sacramento many times, but never east, so that’s what I decided to do one recent Sunday.

wild growing grapes

Here is another plant that grows in dry areas. But the fruit needs shade.

I have already written about the plants that grow along the river, but I never tire of photographing them – always hoping for a better shot than the last one. The jimsonweed with its huge white whorled flowers is always interesting to take pictures of.

jimsonweed

The trail east (towards Folsom) goes through drier land than that found downriver. And at one point the soil becomes almost 100 percent large gravel. This is a deposit from an ancient glacier, as far as geologists can tell. The stones are very worn and rounded. You will see these boulders in gardens; there is so much of it around here.

There is also an area of cliffs upriver. I took some pictures, but they didn’t seem very exciting and I didn’t really want to go on about geology, as it’s not my subject. There are also some really fancy houses up on top of those cliffs (other side of river). The views from up there must be pretty darned good.

Meanwhile, down on the trail a little group riding horses pass by. Horses are allowed along most of this trail, but they have their own paths they are supposed to follow, so they won’t interfere too much with the bike riders. These paths weave in and out along the river bank, sometimes using the bike path shoulder. This time of year you can often tell if there are horses ahead because their passing stirs up dust.

horse riders

Egret

egret by the trail

About a week before I made this trip, I saw a very large bird – probably a blue heron – land on the roof of a nearby house. It reminded me of seeing large birds following the creeks of Pullman down to wintering grounds closer to the big rivers, where it stays warmer and the water doesn’t freeze over.

But the fish eaters in this region don’t need to migrate. It never freezes here. Yet these birds do move around, and I am sure they are joined by more birds that summer at higher elevations were it does freeze in the winter. So there was one, one day, standing on a rooftop in Sacramento.

And then on this trip I saw this bird, an egret, by the trail. Myself and another photographer got pretty close to it before it took off. She had a fast camera and said she got a picture of it flying. It is really quite a large bird so seeing it in flight close to the ground is quite dramatic. My attempt to photograph it in flight captured only blue sky.

Lilacs

An another subject, there is the question of the “California Lilac.” Someone decided to call a bushy tree that somewhat resembles the traditional Lilac of the northwest, midwest and east coast by this name. The Lilac we are used to in “temperate” areas originates in the Mediterranean region (or Asia) and is in the Olive Family and rather closely related to the Privet (which does grow in the Sacramento area).

northern lilac flowers

Real lilacs are in genus Syringa

However, the plant found in drier climates named after the Lilac is in the Buckthorn Family, which has a somewhat unusual flower structure. Many of these species are native to California and are seen all over the place, including in many yards and urban plantings. They can be white, pink, violet (purple). A have seen plants that seemed to have totally red flowers, but those were perhaps a different plant, as Ceanothus flower colors apparently don’t include red. In gardens they do appear much like traditional Lilacs. However, the larger plants remind me a lot of mountain-ash (rowan). This particular specimen was hanging over a fence and getting dried out, but the shot shows its flower very well, with its showy frilled petals seated atop rather long slender stems. This plant was probably bred to have flowers this showy.

california lilac flower

California “lilac” is in genus Ceanothus.

Spring News

31 March 2014

More photos of the tiny white roadside flowers!
They’re back! They are a crucifer, probably an alyssum that most would consider a weed. I took my camera out to “the vacant lot” on a brisk, sunny Sunday afternoon for these shots.

flowers look like snow

They look like snow on the ground from a distance…

drift of tiny white flowers

Get closer and you still can’t really tell..

mat of tiny white flowers

Yes, they are flowers!

huge field of tiny flowers

From an ant’s eye view, they look like a huge field!

flowers in gravel

Basalt gravel adds a little character.

defiant little flower

They defiantly grow where no plant has grown before!

Remote Viewing News

Speaking of defiant, Courtney Brown, who runs the Farsight Institute single-handed, has released his latest project, after much fanfare in an attempt to get more attention. This project concerns the building of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Yes, ETs and cloned rock miners appear to have been involved. The stones (up to 80 tons in weight) were hovered into place with the manual help of human devotees. The sessions include the data that another ET group came in and introduced monotheism to the area. The “magic” of the pyramids had evidently waned by that time, and the people, finally realizing they were free to leave the area, did in droves.

Courtney is convinced that data gained from Scientific Remote Viewing can change the planet for the better, but he has come to understand the grim realities of the situation: He has only two remote viewers he can rely on; the technology is dying out. You need a group to push a new technology forward, or it will die as an esoteric curiosity. Data of this variety is being pushed into the “alternative media” with the hope that it will never be picked up by the mainstream. The “intelligence” community seems very involved in this activity. They also work hard to discredit and/or ruin anyone who has something truly promising or revealing to offer. The strategy is to make the “alternative realities community” – also known as “New Agers” – look like a bunch of kooks so no one who wants to be known as “serious” or “legitimate” will touch them. Works pretty well most of the time.

One year on the Palouse as of end of January!

tiny flowers with bicycle

My bicycle celebrates its first year in service.

Teasel Time

23 July 2013

This article includes quotes from my favorite wildflower book, Michigan Wildflowers by Helen V. Smith with illustrations by Ruth Powell Brede, first published in 1961.

It’s “teasel time” on the Palouse; the teasels are blooming!

teasel-at-roadside

Teasels growing in a gravelly area.

Teasel is in the Valerian Family. Valerian was a Roman emperor, notorious for being forced by others to persecute the Christians. The “valerian” herb is considered a rather potent medicine. Teasels are not native to the Americas.

teasel-in-field

“Teasel is a troublesome weed, but one species, Dipsacus fullonum L. (originally named by Linnaeus), was formerly grown commercially because the ripe inflorescences (flower heads) were used by textile mills for raising the nap on cloth.”

teasel-heads
These flower heads are quite noticeable when blooming, particularly up close.

teasel-head
The flowers are very small, but numerous, and bloom in rings around the head, which gives an unusual and distinct appearance.

teasel-head
teasel-head
This of course is also the time when many other summer flowers bloom. I photographed a few notable examples in a nearby field. Next we see a teasel growing alongside a Mullein plant. Also known as “Flannel Plant,” its leaves are unusually fuzzy.

teasel-and-mullein
Mullein is in the Figwort family. This family also includes Foxglove.
It is plentiful here, but it is one of many weeds introduced from Europe. In this area its flower heads are commonly attacked by insects. I know from other sources that its leaves and flowers have been used for centuries for their medicinal properties. One fascinating aspect of studying wildflowers is to find out how many were used for medicine in past times.

st-johns-wort

St. John’s-wort is showy when it first blooms because of all the flowers. When not blooming it is rarely noticed, but grows practically everywhere. Its small leaves are peculiar in that they are speckled with numerous translucent dots. The common species (Hypericum perforatum L.) was introduced from Europe. It was known there as an herbal medicine and the plant does indeed produce at least two biochemically active compounds.

star-thistle
I have yet to positively identify these striking blue-flowering plants, though they seem to be very similar to the Star-thistle.

cow-parsnip
This large Umbellifer (flowers in umbrella-shaped clusters), is probably Cow Parsnip. The family includes carrots, celery, parsley, anise, chervil, dill and fennel, as well as Poison Hemlock. Smith says of Cow Parsnip:

“The Indians used this species for medicine and food. The young stalks were roasted over hot coals. The leaf stalks were peeled and eaten raw like celery. The young roots when cooked taste like rutabaga.”

grasses
Of course the Palouse is covered with grasses. I am not a grasses expert, so can’t tell you which one these are.

grass-seed-heads
I should not ignore the fruit trees. They are growing produce that will turn ripe a bit later in the season.

unripe-apples
It is calming to walk among these growing things and see them surviving, persevering, quietly and without complaint. Is it not part of our work here to look after them?

Grand Avenue spring overview – closeups

8 June 2013

Top of Grand:

mullein and teasel

Last year’s mullein and teasel still lord over the smaller plants.


dames rocket and flax

Long-time garden escapees, Dame’s Rocket is the four-petaled flower, while Flax has five petals.


SEL Wayside Garden:
The pea family of plants is highlighted in this area (like the most-cultivated crop – lentils)…
lupine

Lupine.


broom groundcover

A carpet of bright broom stays close to the ground.


Upper Grand:
showy composite

I have not yet identified this one.


vetch

Vetch – very showy while it blooms. Another pea family plant.


cinquefoil bush

I believe this is a cinquefoil.


iris

Garden iris in a city-maintained corner mini-park.


slasify

Purple goat’s beard, also called Salsify. The roots are said to be edible.


Mayor’s Grove:
plaque

Mayor’s Grove plaque.


horse chestnut

Horse Chestnut. A very showy tree while blooming.


Lower (South) Grand:
willow fuzz

Willow fuzz looks very pretty when the sun shines through it…


wild rose bush

Wild rose bush, with dogwood in the background.


storksbill

Storksbill going to seed. A tiny spring flower related to the geranium.


Grand Avenue Greenway trail:
grand avenue greenway

Grand Avenue Greenway trail sign.


dames rocket

Dame’s Rocket abounds in this area. It is a crucifer – mustard family.

Vacant lot by the bluff

16 May 2013

The day was beautiful so I took some time to walk around the corner to the vacant lot, with my camera.

The lot, showing bluff, apartment buildings, grass, trees and flowers.
the lot
California poppies are the first to catch the eye…

poppies and alyssum

…shown sharing the field with alyssum.


Their orange flowers are unmistakeable.
poppy flowers
The small trees are cottonwoods.
cottonwood leaves
A wild daisy makes the perfect landing pad…
daisy with fly
Last year’s teasel stands tall.
teasels

They thrive in disturbed soil.


The cliff beneath the bluff is man-made.
cliff
A dandelion flower survives in the cliff’s shade.
dandelions