Posts Tagged ‘psych drugs’

About Letters from Generation Rx

17 February 2019

Letters from Generation Rx is a 2017 documentary by Kevin P. Miller. It’s a follow-up to the 2008 documentary Generation Rx. Both these films feature case histories of families who got involved in the Mental Health System and paid for it dearly.

The more recent film was featured recently on the only TV channel I watch regularly, scientology.tv.

Towards the end of the film, a Canadian researcher Bonnie Kaplan is featured. She has been doing research into the therapeutic value of “micro-nutrients,” the latest term for vitamins and minerals.

When I looked her up to see if she had done any lecture videos, I found the site Mad In America Continuing Education. Mad In America was a book written by investigative journalist Robert Whitaker about the current U.S. Mental Health System. He has been featured prominently in several Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) videos about psychiatric abuses.

Bonnie Kaplan is prominently featured in a free “course” on nutritional treatments for mental illnesses. She and her colleague Julia Rucklidge go through all the evidence, from anecdotal to full Double Blind Studies, on the mental health benefits of improving nutrition. These are simple, cost-effective ways to improve physical and mental well-being in a community. They can be implemented by any Public Health agency simply by advising clients to eat better and take extra vitamins and minerals. The basic philosophy behind this “therapy” is supported by every sane doctor and healer who has been informed of its effectiveness.

The question is: (and both these academic researchers ask this question) Why is nutritional therapy not widely practiced (in the fields of medicine and psychology, and in our Mental Health System) as our first line of defense against mental problems?

Kevin P. Miller states his answer to that question pretty clearly in both of his films: The U.S. Mental Health System was established, and is operated today, to make money for psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry – with tacit consent from the FDA. People in academia have a hard time accepting this answer. They think of psychiatry, psychology and medicine as “their kind” and cannot believe that trained professionals would stoop so low as to ignore patient deaths in return for industry consulting fees. What is clear to a student of Scientology, if not a student of life such as Kevin Miller, is that elements in the “professions” have always done this, and probably always will.

Our huge challenge now is to remove such persons from positions of power and influence in society before they complete their secret goal of tearing society apart. They are not well-organized, but they can muster amazing “convincing arguments.” And they are protected to a certain extent by the blind spot most well-intentioned people have on the subject of evil intentions. Look at the historical example of Hitler’s Nazis. How many were able to accurately predict the events that included the great war in Europe? These events were being threatened publicly in speeches by Hitler himself. Yet only a few could believe that he would actually go that far. Well, his people did go that far.

The best response this planet has mustered so far to the atrocities connected with World War II has been to draft a Universal Declaration of Human Rights, put it on a shelf somewhere, and hope the problem would go away.

Well, it hasn’t. I must say that it is Scientologists who are at the center of not only pointing out that there still is a huge problem on Earth, but also manning and funding campaigns to turn the planet around. Their story has remained largely untold, as most major media outlets are in bed with the criminals.

And in related news…

I don’t actually follow the news, for the reason stated immediately above. But I do buy fruit, and I do remember articles I have read about various subjects… so I was a bit surprised to find this tag on my Winco pineapple today.

Disney-and-dole-2019

Dole is one of a few very large food companies that operate in “third world” countries but are owned by United States citizens. These food companies have been implicated in a variety of criminal activities in the countries where they operated, activities that were only undertaken to improve or protect their corporate interests and profits. One such activity was the rebellion of Americans living in Hawaii against the native government (a monarchy), resulting in Hawaii eventually becoming a state, which reduced the cost of selling Hawaiian produce in the U.S.

More horrendous stories are told of what American fruit companies did in Central America to try to prevent local influence in their huge plantation operations. Typical was the ouster of Jacobo Árbenz from Guatemala in 1954, engineered by United Fruit Company in cooperation with various elements of the U.S. government. Árbenz had been the democratically elected President of Guatemala.

Disney produced a multitude of cartoon shorts in support of various U.S. government policies and actions across the world. Though I have seen some accusations connected with the making of “Saludos Amigos,” a 1943 attempt to improve relations between the U.S. and Latin America, in the face of expanding Nazi influence in that region, I cannot find any particular mention of Disney films supporting the U.S. “anti Communism” crusade against governments in Central America that wanted to curb illegal actions by American fruit companies operating there.

On the other hand, it is now a documented fact that elements of the U.S. government did collude with United Fruit and other companies to overthrow regimes that wanted to instigate reforms on the huge plantations. Many died during those struggles to give Central American agricultural workers a better life. Though the region has become more peaceful, except where the illegal drug trade has taken hold, I don’t know that those issues were ever fully resolved. That is another measure of the intractability (difficulty in curing) the problem of criminal influence in high places.

 

 

Answers to Drugs

22 September 2017

Yesterday I attended a public information session concerning the increasing use of marijuana and other drugs. This session was organized by Bishop Ron Allen who heads the International Faith Based Coalition. This is an anti-drug-abuse group. He had this session video-taped for use in his outreach work.

Two of the presenters were with the Colorado National Marijuana Initiative. They were there representing the President’s Office of National Drug Control Policy.

From official websites:

A component of the Executive Office of the President, ONDCP was created by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 [which extended an act by the same name passed 2 years earlier]. The ONDCP Director is the principal advisor to the President on drug control issues. ONDCP coordinates the drug control activities and related funding of 16 Federal Departments and Agencies.

ONDCP also administers two grant programs: the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) and Drug-Free Communities (DFC).

The High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) program, created by Congress with the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, provides assistance to Federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies operating in areas determined to be critical drug-trafficking regions of the United States.

The National Marijuana Initiative (NMI) is one of three national initiatives within the HIDTA program.

Other presenters

Another presenter was with the California Dept. of Justice Advanced Training Center.

The first presenter, who did not sit on the panel, was the ED of Omni Youth Programs, a non-profit, non-governmental “agency” operating in Sacramento County. She is college-trained with a background in both traditional and non-traditional therapies. She is assisted at Omni by a trained Family Therapist.

She explained to the audience that Omni’s approach to drug abuse is to target correlated factors such as child and family violence. These factors are linked to drug abuse (alcohol abuse in particular) by many studies (I assume mostly done by sociologists). These factors are addressed through group training programs. Omni trains the trainers who then go out and train groups. If this training is like other methods I have heard about, it focuses on changing “undesirable” behaviors into more desirable ones. We can assume that this work is moderately beneficial, but it uses technologies that can also be applied to more sinister forms of social control, and involves no real therapy on a personal level. Measures of the effectiveness of this work were not stressed in her short talk, but the website indicates positive results in 6- and 12-month follow-up studies.

Criminalize it

The federal approach to the drug problem is to criminalize drug production (where possible), trafficking, and use. About half of all Federal prisoners are there on drug trafficking charges. This is about 100,000 people. There are only about 250 people in federal prisons for possession only, but in state prisons there are roughly 50,000 more. There were roughly 160,000 drug traffickers in state prisons in recent years.

These figures must not include many major in-country producers, as drug production figures show no sign of heading downwards. However, many of these drugs, even Meth and LSD, have significant non-US sources, and most illegal drugs are majorly produced outside of the US.

The law-based approach to drug abuse control gives a lot of people a lot of things to do, but gives no particular sign of being effective. As is the case with most lawmaking, anti-drug laws are on the books because they are demanded by popular opinion, or give the government the feeling they are “doing something,” not because they are effective at dealing with social problems.

The federal people at this event argued for a continued legal and regulatory approach to the problem, bolstered by information campaigns, which have shown some effectiveness.

If marketing is effective, why bother with criminalization?

My take would be to trash the legal approach and continue the information campaigns. This might seem hypocritical to some, but passing laws about things just doesn’t seem to work. Private corporations, which have no direct ability to make law (though they do lobby abundantly, per all reports), have grown strong on marketing alone. Marketing and propaganda can breath life into a failed idea or kill a successful one. I think the effectiveness of marketing stems from its stress on giving people reasons to do things rather than reasons to stop doing things. Starting remains more popular than stopping in this society and probably always will. The stoppers are doomed to a minority status, even if they gain control of government or industry for a time. One of the greatest paradoxes we live with today has been our success at starting wars. Wars have always been seen primarily as stops because of their destructive results, but we have become convinced that they have “constructive” purposes in society, so they are now broadly supported (at least in the US).

That wars are constructive is of course a lie. So what we have in the US is a situation where the public is being lied to broadly and believing most of it. This is a sad situation, and is the road to a totally out-ethics (self-destructive) nation, which we are rapidly becoming. Drug use is a part of this greater overall picture.

What my church is doing

Several programs sponsored by church members address these issues. They operate independently of church organizations:

Narconon handles the drug abuse problem by operating rehabilitation facilities across the planet.

The Truth About Drugs program backs up this work with drug education materials and activities.

United for Human Rights seeks to empower victims of criminal abuses by informing them of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The Way to Happiness program distributes a secular moral code across the planet in about 100 languages.

That booklet is also used by Criminon, which is a criminal rehabilitation program.

Applied Scholastics seeks to improve study skills, as laid out in our Study Technology, through its international teacher training center and in schools across the planet.

Hubbard College of Administration similarly teaches our management technology.

The Volunteer Ministers are organized to assist in disaster relief, often working alongside the Red Cross and government groups. Volunteer Ministers can also get trained in all facets of Scientology so they can help friends, neighbors and strangers more effectively.

And the Citizens Commission on Human Rights seeks to put ethics in on the psychiatrist-lead mental health system.

Drugs and Psychotherapy

The connection between drugs and psychotherapy might not be apparent to some, so let me clarify: People seek therapy usually due to experiencing some “mental problem.” They quite often don’t make this move until they are acutely suffering. Traditionally the therapist talks to the person (now often called “talk therapy”) in the hopes of giving the person some helpful realizations. This sort of therapy is no longer popular; it is not covered by many forms of medical insurance, and it takes a lot of time. So if the talk therapy doesn’t work or is unavailable, drugs are resorted to. Usually some drug can be found that will alleviate the symptoms. It will do nothing about the underlying cause. That means that drugs can “hook” people, because the symptoms return if drug use stops.

So we see drug use as a result of ineffective psychotherapies, as well as lack of access to any therapy other than drugs. Drugs are seen by beginning users as therapeutic, and in the past have often been sold that way. For instance, laudanum – a strong opioid drug – started as a pain relief medicine. So did the modern forms of opium, morphine (still used), heroin and cocaine. To that list add “legitimate” drugs prescribed by psychiatrists, and we see that whole profession falling into the pit of hiding symptoms behind a drug fog, rather than treating root cause. And: As long as they continue to believe that the mind is the brain – a widely disproved misconception – they will continue to fail in their assigned role in society, if they even care what that is.

The result of the failure of psychotherapy to deliver relief where it is most desired has resulted in the current drug situation. The only real solution is to start providing a psychotherapy (or whatever you choose to call it) that really works.

None of the panelists at the event I attended suggested this.

Volunteering at CCHR

18 September 2012

CCHR stands for Citizens Commission on Human Rights.
It’s a watchdog group founded by the Church of Scientology, and its target is psychiatry.
Link to CCHR website.

Our message comes to my town

To forward its mission of exposing psychiatric abuses, CCHR developed a video (on DVD) and an exhibit to go with it which they call “Industry of Death.” Around 2006, copies of this exhibit were made that could be loaded into trucks and taken around to various places. Each year, one such exhibit comes to Seattle, and I volunteer to help man it.

For the past three years, the “traveling exhibit” has been located in my neighborhood, called Capitol Hill. This neighborhood, as you might expect, is up on a large hill (or ridge) just east of downtown Seattle. It is a mix of urban shopping streets and apartment buildings, with neighborhoods of single-family houses, mostly to the east and north. On the northwest side of The Hill are some of the fanciest residences in Seattle.

The Hill is known for its Gay community. It is also home to many artists, designers and techies. And it houses many college students, as well as many families connected with the nearby universities.

Broadway is the first major north-south street on The Hill, closest to downtown. People come up to Broadway to shop, hang out at coffee houses, go to clubs, see art films, live, or beg for money from locals and visitors.

The exhibit is in an old brick building right next to Dick’s, the locally famous fast food chain. Across the street, a subway station – planned years before the 2008 crash – is being built. It won’t be finished for another 4 years. A little farther south is the Post Office, and just beyond that, Seattle Central Community College.

Seattle Central serves as a feeder school for the local universities. Many Asian students take classes there while they learn to speak English. It is also strong in the arts, design, culinary, and IT.

Seattle itself is considered friendly to psychiatry. Our U.S. Congressman is a psychiatrist. The military has a huge presence in the Seattle area, and they use psychiatrists a lot. The big IT companies like Amazon and Microsoft are pretty much behind psychiatry. And so is the aerospace industry, led by Boeing.

But on the Hill, at the CCHR traveling exhibit, we see a lot of people who have been damaged by psychiatric practices. Sometimes the people who live on the street come in and talk with us. They are almost all in the mental health system. Others, like John, have friends or family who have been affected. His sister has a daughter who was taken out of her house by Child Protective Services because her older brother got violent after he was put back on psych drugs. I talked to a father who was told he needed to put his son on Paxil. He knew better, and refused. But many others didn’t. Every year, we meet many people who are on psych drugs or who know someone who is. They think that ADHD or schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder are real diseases that must be treated by drugs. We try to show them that they have been lied to about this. Some are persuaded, and others are not.

Microcosm for the universe

Here on Capitol Hill – particularly when CCHR comes to town – we have in miniature a display of all the major forces, conditions, and considerations that exist in the universe.

What is success? Is it physical security, such as that you can obtain by being rich? Or is it excellence of artistic or technological achievement? Or is it simply the feeling that “I have succeeded, and I can continue to succeed.”

What is happiness? Is it the buzz you get when you are a little drunk or a little high? Is it having friends? Or having a lover? It is the giddy cheerfulness of innocence? Or is it the sober certainty of experience, wisdom, and demonstrated ability?

What is proper governance? Is it having the population under control? Or is it having a population that can control itself?

What is the correct way to do business? Does it consist of making huge profits for the business owners and fooling all the customers into believing that they have been well-served? Or does it consist of providing products and services that will assist people is their quest for real success and happiness?

When CCHR comes to town, it asks Seattle to re-consider these things.

And when your conscience comes to visit you, it may ask you to do something similar. What is right and what is wrong? And how can rightness prevail?

These are universal questions. These are personal questions. They deserve consideration.

This year CCHR is in Seattle, at 127 Broadway East, from 15 September to 5 October. Noon to 8pm weekdays, noon to 6 pm weekends.