Posts Tagged ‘organizing’

The Election

7 November 2016

The sites I follow are buzzing about this U.S. election.

Here is my take on it at this point:

Hillary stands for business-as-usual; a predictable outcome.

Trump stands for disruptive changes; he seems unpredictable at this point.

No one in the race stands for planned change based on ethical principles and workable management processes, implemented in an organized manner. Such a being would be the only one deserving a place of leadership at this time.

Is there a higher struggle?

The media, the pundits, and academics for the most part, dismiss the idea that a lot is going on in secret; that these candidates are merely proxies for power groups that wish to remain hidden and unidentified.

The alternative news sources that I follow, on the other hand, see this as the obvious truth of the situation and openly mock anyone who refuses to see it and deal with it.

The problem is that the alternative sources don’t have it right, either. And it’s my guess that this is because they rely too heavily for data on “insiders.”

For instance, Veterans Today thinks Hillary is being supported by the more moderate power groups who ultimately oppose the extremists who are supporting Trump. Their editor Gordon Duff accuses the FBI of being full of conspiracy theorists and protectors of criminals. Odd he’d say that, as Gordon is one of the biggest conspiracy theorists on the planet. And I don’t use that term derogatorily.

Meanwhile, over in England Simon Parkes is telling us that the FBI is made up mostly of people who are trying to do the right thing and don’t want a known pedophile working as our President. While Trump’s not much better, he stands for change and change is what is needed.

Julian Assange in a recent interview said he thinks Trump will not be allowed to serve in office even if he overwhelmingly wins the popular vote. However, he also said that Hillary’s accusations that Russia is behind the most recent release of documents is totally ridiculous.

I also ran across an October video from Clif High, a Seattle software genius who data mines the internet to find “data sets” that indicate the most desired (and probable) future. He finds a landslide popular win for Trump which the rest of the world reacts to with total disgust. Almost all countries holding U.S. debt contracts try to dump them, precipitating tremendous inflation here in the U.S. Meanwhile, U.S. officials refuse to allow Trump to take office, but Hillary has disappeared and cannot be located.

The best-organized group wins

Here is a key datum about politics:

“A small group thoroughly organized can conquer the disorganized billions.”

L. Ron Hubbard, ORGANIZATION AND MORALE, 1 Nov 1970.

If you want to figure out what group is really running this planet these days (if there is just one) then look for that group that is extremely well-organized. In human groups this has often meant a group beaten into being organized. Unfortunately, it doesn’t really matter exactly how the group maintains and defends its organization; it just has to be very well-organized. A group that depends on constant threats of violence to maintain organization will eventually falter, as the most brilliant beings will usually leave it. But this basic datum still holds.

And the most organized group I am aware of – at least it used to be extremely tightly organized per reports – is the one running our secret space programs. Descriptions of it come from Corey Goode, William Tompkins, Sean David Morton, Steven Greer and other researchers and past insiders.

Per Tompkins and some others, this particular group is part of a longer lineage of powerful groups that get created due to rivalries between various ET groups regarding Earth. One ET alliance prefers an invasion approach to expansion, mirrored on Earth by groups currently centered in Europe. Another alliance prefers a more peaceful approach based on free trade. They are both interested in Earth at this time, and have had some interest for many centuries into the past. But now Earth is set up to go Space Opera, and the number of ET groups now interested in Earth has multiplied.

Of course there is another large body of ET communities that would prefer to just be left alone. But they are, almost by definition, less well-organized. So in this universe, they are very likely to get run over (or be overrun).

Need of Change

Masses of people in the U.S., to say nothing of other areas on the planet, really want change. They need something to break loose and reveal a path forward. Most of them have no idea of exactly what that path should be. Thus, at this point they are revolutionaries, or nearly at that point, as there is a minimum of planning and organization amongst them as a whole. They are very numerous, but:

“Revolution never produces anything. Throwing something out of gear momentarily, the vast inertia of a people closes in again and patches it all up.

“Evolution can be fairly fast, but evolution is on a level of the people, not on the level of the government.

“You have to change the people to change the government.”

— L. Ron Hubbard (From a lecture of 10 November 1952.)

Here he makes a distinction between “people” (disorganized) and “government” (organized) long before he became immersed in the study of organizing and management that he undertook when he managed Saint Hill as the first advanced Scientology organization on the planet in the 1960s.

Take a look at the American Revolution for example (this analysis based only on my current understanding). It was instigated by professional people and businessmen who also functioned as academics and politicians. Thus, it was built on idealism more than on organization. They were aided against Britain by France – which was itself going down an anti-aristocracy path at the time.

But just as Napoleon effectively killed, or usurped, the French Revolution in the early 1800s, so Britain re-invaded the U.S. during the War of 1812. The French had basically given all of the Midwest to the U.S. in 1803, which freaked out the British Empire, thinking it still had large amounts of leverage over the rebel colonies. But instead of re-invading, the British were apparently convinced to approach the problem differently.

With the help of the Louisiana Purchase, the U.S. established a very strong foothold in the Americas over the next 100 years, but by the end of that time, Europe had arranged a new control structure in the form of its network of Central Banks.

Who has the upper hand?

In 1967, Hubbard identified a small group based in the City of London which controlled most English-language news outlets and was tightly connected to certain banking and industrial interests, as well as psychiatry as represented by groups like the Tavistock Institute.

This group was believed to be behind the shellacking that Scientology was getting in the press in those years.

At the time, it was a big revelation for all of us. But LRH never said that this was the only secret power group in existence on Earth; or that it had no rivals; or exactly how ET might be involved. So I resort to other sources for clues:

The “invader alliance” is commonly identified as composed of Draco, Reptilians and some human types – not all individuals of these descriptions, though – and is usually identified with the European Royals and the Vatican, along with their bankers, who are related to Zionism and are Earth’s warmongers.

The other ET group attempted to influence technological and spiritual thinking in Germany in the early 1900s, but that did not go well. They have continued to make various contact attempts, such as those reported by Tompkins in his interviews and first book. As a result of this the military-industrial complex has apparently remained factionalized along lines that I think of as Group Tone Level. Some factions prefer a more conservative approach to politics, preferring persuasion, negotiation, and even convincing PR stunts, rather than constantly resorting to war. Other factions live on war and wouldn’t know what to do without it. Those groups are clearly insane, while the others are only irritatingly neurotic.

Some think the Clintons are in the conservative camp, while others are quite sure they are totally insane. Some think Trump is firmly dominated by criminals and warmongers, while others feel he might actually be in slightly better condition, mentally, than Hillary. How am I supposed to know who’s right, beyond just looking into their faces when they talk and reading the signs?

I think they are both crazy, as what other personality type would run for U.S. President at this time (who had a serious possibility of getting into office)?

Whether this election results in “business-as-usual” or unpredictable changes, I think we still have a lot to learn about people, about politics, and about ourselves. Ultimately, until a being can look at a situation and just know the truth of it, he doesn’t know the truth of it. So let’s work at developing that ability rather than playing around trying to second-guess each other.

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Frosted Thanksgiving

28 November 2015

frosted thaksgiving missouri flats

“Missouri Flats” nature area – view from the hill I live on.


My theory for how this frost forms is that the clouds actually come down to ground level at night, and everything that’s the right temperature picks up the ice crystals. The longer the weather conditions remain favorable, the longer and more elaborate the crystals become.

This weather is not that uncommon during the Pullman winter (see
my post “Freezing Fog”) but I’ve never seen it happen this early.

Thanksgiving

SEL does a long Thanksgiving weekend instead of Christmas. Sometimes I go visit family, but this year I stayed home. I was invited over for Thanksgiving dinner by a young technician I work with and his wife. They’re Mormons from Idaho. She had prepared LOTS of food. She said it was the first time she’d cooked such a dinner herself. I enjoyed a few hours at their apartment with them and their two little girls.

I spent that evening and the next day getting a signal generator up and running, as part of my electronic art (eArt) project. If you set it just right, the signals look like floating needles (Scientology technical term) on my meters.

Time to organize – continued

The effort to throw out junk, consolidate the rest, organize everything and fit more into less space continues. The signal generator was made using my new “flat form factor” design. It’s rack mount equipment but only about 6 inches deep. More of that’s in the works.

Deeper equipment cabinets and enclosures are more and more being used for storage. The flat equipment fits in sideways, and my older “long” enclosures can go into a bigger rack enclosure when not being used.

Following the news

It’s been cold but peaceful on the Palouse. I wish everyone across the planet who wanted it peaceful could have it that way.

In Syria Russia has been showing NATO how to fight terrorists. NATO, and especially Turkey, seem offended by this. The alternative media claims this is because NATO was secretly helping the terrorists overthrow Assad. (He has a lovely wife, by the way – have you seen photos of her?) NATO is the lesser military arm of the bad guys in the West; the U.S. military being their greater arm. This seems to actually be the case – a very unfortunate state of affairs.

Meanwhile, Corey Goode continues to release transcripts of his video interviews with David Wilcock (the TV shows cost money to watch). These interviews are about the formation of a “breakaway civilization” on earth. This was started in earnest by the Germans in the 1930s. Some call them “Nazis” but these particular Germans don’t seem so interested in all that any more. They have found ways to move about quickly in space, and started colonies on the Moon and Mars. After the war, they got the U.S. “military-industrial complex” (see Eisenhower’s speech) involved in their plan, and they have more and more been letting this planet go to hell as they shift their attention to their off-planet operations.

Seems all quite fanciful, but would explain a lot. Catherine Austin Fitts (a former HUD Assistant Secretary), who insists a “black budget” exists on this planet that is draining trillions of dollars annually out of earth’s economy, has been working to find more solid evidence for “black projects.” But so far there are only bits here and there.

Courtney Brown, the remote viewing guy, has been laying low since the release of the first part of his latest project – the JFK assassination. Hopefully he is finishing the second part, but is behind schedule on this. The first part – predictably – found several professional snipers involved, and not the “lone nut” Oswald, as maintained by the Warren Commission. The second part promises to go more deeply into the plot.

So here in the freezing cold of a Frosted Thanksgiving, I learn more about the “unofficial” history of our planet, while making art out of old electronic equipment…

frosted wild rose

Frosted twig (wild rose).

…starting to come together…

1 November 2015
interactive art rack

Equipment rack for interactive art projects.

The idea of making interactive art didn’t occur to me until rather recently. I got into electronics via audio – amplifiers and the like – and then started getting interested in music synthesis. Later I got into measurements, digital control, and computers.

During my Sea Org years I realized that not many people knew about basic electricity and electronics, yet Hubbard was using examples from those subjects in his books and lectures. So that gave me the idea of a learning lab centered around electronics. The Exploratorium in San Francisco is an example of an interactive learning environment. I wanted to do something like that at home.

It was not until 2009, when I had a lot of time on my hands but not much cash, that I started buying used gadgets at Goodwill and re-purposing them at my workbench. It was at this point that I started working on interactive “art” designs – possibly inspired by Halloween.

Making interactive art installations using electronics is certainly not an original idea with me. There are lots of examples out there, from merely cute to ponderously imposing. I was thinking in terms of something someone might have in a room at home, that would sort of “wake up” and start doing things when people came in. The development of such a system, though, was a lot more involved than I originally imagined. I still don’t have a fully interactive “dream” system up and running. But I have lots of pieces of one, and I needed a way to tie them all together.

The numbers of inputs and outputs that would probably be needed to develop such a system was difficult for me to confront. I imagined something like the old MOOG synthesizers – a mass of patch cables. But nothing seemed to come together until I purchased a used Extron video switching system for the aluminum enclosure, and found out what the back panel looked like. More signal connectors on one panel than I’d ever seen before! Finally I started working on a couple such panels to modify them to do what I thought I would need. It was not the easiest project I’ve ever attempted, but it’s beginning to be actually usable.

Technical details

I have chosen the 19-inch rack-mount form factor for my work. It is the most widely-used mounting system for professional equipment. The average rack cabinet, however, is designed for enclosures that are rather deep (more than a foot), while the things I am making are quite shallow (less than 1/2 a foot). But moving beyond the 19-inch equipment rack is another project.

Let’s go through the equipment in the top photo:
1) A row of four voltage-controlled fans, inspired by a TED Talk I saw of a guy who did some amazing things with remote-controlled fans.
2) Example of a piece of used equipment, not yet re-purposed.
3) A system for developing Arduino projects, made from a used enclosure, of course.
4) My matrix of connectors, used to route various control signals to displays or similar devices. You can see that this isn’t finished yet; none of the controls have knobs!

So far I only have a few displays and sensors to experiment with. But several others are just waiting to be finished.

Audio in or audio out?

In another part of the room, my audio rack has been newly re-assembled.

While my interactive art focuses on sound and motion as inputs and light patterns as outputs, on this rack the output is sound. That means it includes two speakers and a stereo amp, effects to be applied to sound inputs, and the beginnings of a synthesizer. Also included is my latest version of my “LED oscilloscope” and tone generator.

audio rack

Equipment rack for audio projects.

Everything is made from used gear re-purposed for what I want it to do. And all these projects are in a constant state of re-development. I keep older gear until I find or make something better to replace it with. The older stuff gets trashed or re-used inside newer projects.

Organize or perish!

The decision to organize better did not come easily. Organizing and rebuilding old equipment takes time, so I can only do so much of it. But it is a rock-solid basic ingredient to making any activity viable. So I’ve been pushing it forward, and wanted to document the current scene.

Java – diving in

6 March 2014

What it takes to write a program – briefly?

Back when I was using DOS [the Disk Operating system sold with most PCs (personal computers)], there was a program included called QBasic. You ran the program and there was a window (a DOS window) where you could write your own little programs. Then you would run them from inside the QBasic program.

This was a very simple functionality for writing software. However, we still follow this fundamental pattern. The program you write software in is now called an IDE – Integrated Development Environment. You develop software by writing and editing code. An average biggish program will make use of many code libraries. These all have to be in places where the IDE can find them. As the functions implemented by your application become more complex, the connections between the various different parts become more numerous.

What does it take to write a program? I takes an IDE, or something like one.

Java

The Java language and approach was created in the 1990s by a computer scientist at Sun (Stanford University Network) Microsystems. By 2007 it had become completely open-source (all code freely available to the public). In 2009 Oracle, a huge software company, bought Sun with the promise to keep Java open source.

The Java approach was to create a language that would be the basis for programs that could run on any operating system. This language is VERY widely used. Its users include huge companies like Boeing, governments, the military, robotics competitions and programming hobbyists.

NetBeans

NetBeans is Oracle’s IDE for Java. It started as a student programming project in Prague (a beautiful city in central Europe). It was purchased by Sun in 1999, and was made open-source soon after that.

One reason it is called NetBeans is because Java is very widely used to create applications that run over networks. Network applications are more complicated than desktop applications because they require communication between computers and sharing resources among multiple users. Of course, Java can also be use to create desktop applications.

Here is a screenshot of a sample NetBeans project:

netbeans example

This shows two views of the same project. One view shows the actual folder structure of the project, and the other shows the project in a way that should assist a developer to work on it.

Note that the number of different parts that make up this “simple” project is quite large. This is rather daunting for the beginner!

What I wanted to do

Years ago I learned that a game controller, usually called a “joystick” after the control stick used in helicopters and jets (a rather base play on words – common among pilots), was extremely simple to make. It seemed like an ideal way to add some hardware knobs to any sort of control application. I wanted to have a piece of code that would allow me to use human-controlled joystick positions in my software applications.

In the “old days” of DOS, this wasn’t too hard to do. You could write commands that took data directly from the computer’s hardware interface.

But “modern” computers, in an attempt to become much more versatile, no longer access hardware directly, but communicate to the hardware through “drivers” that are little pieces of software that make some particular piece of hardware look to the operating system like a generalized, or generic, piece of hardware. So the operating system only has to worry about “printers” and “keyboards” and “game controllers” instead of all the different specific models that exist. And the hardware manufacturer is responsible for providing drivers for different operating systems that they want their hardware to work with.

Windows, in particular, has been through a lot of changes in how its hardware drivers work. This is partly because it is trying to anticipate future hardware innovations and make operating systems that will be compatible with them.

Thus, talking to an old-fashioned DOS joystick on a Windows computer is now basically impossible. You need an intermediate piece of hardware (thankfully not too expensive) to make the “legacy” joystick look like a USB game controller. Then you can choose one of several ways of talking to the USB game controller — your joystick.

I was not getting anywhere finding code examples that worked in my Microsoft IDE (Visual Studio – I learned to use it at Seattle Central Community College), so I thought I might try Java.

My first choice for a Java IDE was Eclispe. This is an open-source IDE developed by IBM. It is about 10 years younger than Java and is in fact written in Java. I had heard good things about it including the fact that it is very versatile through the use of feature “plug-ins.”

Here is a screenshot of just a portion of the application. It is really very similar to other IDEs. However, the best code examples I could find were developed using NetBeans. Each IDE uses its own internal folder structure. So you can’t really take a NetBeans Java project and just copy it over to Eclipse and have it work fine.

eclipse-example

Success!

If you have a USB joystick, on Windows 7 you can go to the Control Panel, choose Devices and Printers, and you should find listed your game controller (if it’s plugged in). You can right click it, select “…settings” and then click the Properties button. It should bring up a little window that graphically shows the joystick, sliders and buttons on the game controller, and the graphic will change as you move the controls or press the buttons. This is exactly what the code I found implements using Java. It’s a very interesting piece of code, and it is comprised of (count them!) three major parts and about 15 different functions. That doesn’t count all the stuff that Java takes care of for you. So this function is not as simple as I’d like it to be, but at least I finally have some code I can look at. (This is available in a zip file called JInputJoystickTestV2.zip from http://theuzo007.wordpress.com/2013/10/26/joystick-in-java-with-jinput-v2/ .)

More on project folders

It took me a while to learn to use folders to organize my code projects – even the ones I did without a real IDE (I learned to create PHP applications without using an IDE). I finally decided on a standard folder structure for my PHP projects, and it has helped me to “throw together” an idea, because I can just start by copying a similar project into a new folder.

Below is a little illustration of someone’s website folders. The “eng” stands for “English.” The other folders are similar to the ones I use. One for HTML pages, which may be “static” or contain code in them. One for images. A website can have a LOT of images! One for styles, which are files written in a language called CSS – Cascading Style Sheets – that describe how a website should look, but contain no content. And one for “js” – JavaScripts. JavaScripts are not really related to Java, and are a little controversial. They are basically little programs that download with a web page and run in your browser. They can therefore potentially do bad things to your computer. They are supposed to only do things to your web page, though, and now most browsers are built in a way to help ensure that JavaScripts only operate on the document being displayed. Still, I don’t like to use them. I prefer to rely on built-in browser functionality to do things on a web page.

And with that little digression, goodbye for today!

website-example