Posts Tagged ‘flowers’

April Showers Bring May Flowers…

12 May 2018

…at least, that’s how it works here in Sacramento.

jasmine bush

Jasmine bush growing in my backyard.


columbine flowers

Columbine in garden just down the street.


catalpa tree

Catalpa tree next to the school.


Dietes - African iris

African iris – genus Dietes – in a school parking lot.


bottlebrush flowers

Bottlebrush in parking lot of a suburban shopping center.


flowering tree

Flowering tree in the neighborhood.


evening primrose flowers

Evening primrose – genus Oenothera – spilling onto the sidewalk.


privet bush flowers

Privet bush in Howe Park.


honeysuckle flowers

Honeysuckle in Howe Park.


wild iris also known as flag

Wild iris – also known as Flag – in Howe Park.


lobelia flowers

Lobelia in native plants garden.


yarrow

Yarrow in native plants garden.


lupine flowers

Lupine. This is near the volunteer center at William B. Pond park.

These next three are the most profuse flowering plants in American River Parkway. You can find fields full of these plants. The major larger plant in these areas is the Elderberry – see previous post.

vetch flowers

Vetch photographed in Michigan in 1971.


cow parsnip flowers

Umbels of cow parsnip flowers.


yellow rocket flowers

Mustard family plant – probably yellow rocket.

The following plants can be found along the bike path in large quantities. They enjoy full sun, but will also grow in shady areas.

blackberry flower with bee

Blackberry flower being visited by a bee.


thistle flower

Thistle.


hawkweed

Hawkweed grows closer to the ground.


wild rose

Wild rose – not that common in the parkway.


california poppies

California poppies.

You may have to leave the bike path (as I did) to find these plants. They are better known as woodland wildflowers, and the bike path runs along the edge of the riparian (riverside) woodlands, but not so much through them.

st john's wort

St John’s wort.


mint

A less conspicuous mint.


mint-related plant

A mint-related plant favoring shady areas.


fleawort

The homely plantain, now called fleawort to reduce confusion with the banana. Genus Plantago.

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Second Warm Period on the Palouse

21 May 2017

The plants are popping out very strongly on our warmer days.

They seem proud this year. The weather was rough, and the warmth came late. They suffered this Spring, but came through it OK.

I hope we can do the same!

flowering apple tree

“I’m the best apple tree on the Palouse.”

quail on pullman trail

Quail like sunny days, too.

Spring!

17 April 2016
dandelions

Dandelions: The yellow harbingers of Spring.

This year we had a mild, wet winter, followed by a late cool-down, then a sudden warm-up. The result: Everything seemed to bloom at once!

This made available many non-showy tree flowers, which don’t get photographed very often.

All these photos were taken last weekend.

Nature area trees

Ash flowers

Ash flowers.

Maple flowers

Maple flowers.

Willow flowers

Willow flowers.

Fruit trees

flowering fruit trees

Flowering fruit trees.

In this area, most fruit trees are introduced. I haven’t tried to figure out here exactly which types of tree these are. All the showy-flowered fruit trees are in the Rose Family (Rosaceae) along with familiar fruits like raspberries and strawberries.

meadow by the bike path

Meadow by the bike path.

fruit tree flowers

Fruit tree flowers.

Bees (present but not pictured) pollinate all Rose Family plants. In contrast, most of the non-showy tree flowers are wind-pollinated, and their seeds wind-scattered.

urban fruit tree

Fruit tree in an urban setting.

Daffodils

Pullman daffodils

Pullman daffodils.

Somebody planted a lot of daffodils! I have never noticed them as much as I did this Spring. They are all over the place in the more recently developed areas. And I mean , really all over.

daffodils in runoff management area

Daffodils front runoff management area, Bishop Boulevard.

redwing blackbird

Redwing blackbird guarding his domain.

Walmart embankment

The “Walmart Embankment” and more daffodils.

daffodils

Daffodils up close.

Introduced urban trees

Aspen flowers

Aspen flowers.

I found this white-barked aspen near the top of the “south hill” in the hospital’s garden. It is not native to this area, nor is the birch pictured below. Birch, besides being somewhat delicate trees and preferring the protection of a forest, don’t seem to do that well in this area, but that doesn’t prevent this specimen in the middle of downtown from doing the best it can to reproduce.

birch flowers

Birch flowers