Posts Tagged ‘American River Bikeway’

Pictures From Recent Travels

4 November 2018

It’s finally time to sit down and share some photographs. These start in the hot days of August this year.

ICP redding

Our tent at the Incident Command Post near Redding.

20 Aug 2018 Redding scene

Open land near freeway in Redding. This is the same type of ecosystem that was being burned in the fires. Grass under scrub oak.

Redding dried flowers

Naturally dried asters in Redding.

bird on a wire

Dove on a wire near the Orland ICP, near Redding.

Redding Trader Joes

Smoke masks for handout in Redding.

By the following month I was back at another disaster site, this time in North Carolina.

storm damage removal

Storm damage removal site near Jacksonville, North Carolina.

fallen tree

Example of storm damage before the removal process.

after removal process

Example of what is left behind.

little lizard

Small lizard comes out to watch us at a park near the shore.

toy loader

Toy loader at one of our work sites.

boiling spring lakes

Clearing storm damage from a back yard.

damaged church

Work party at a church that suffered water damage.

tents at boiling spring lakes

Our setup at Boiling Spring Lakes, 6 October.

washed out dam

Washed out levee (dam) at Boiling Spring Lakes. This was an earthen structure constructed like a levee but functioning as a dam. The steel side rail to the road that used to run across the top of the dam can be seen hanging in midair. Behind, the lake that this dam used to create has completely emptied. The water drained into an area that is mostly a nature preserve, but did flood some houses.

VM team

Our hygiene kit handout team on 7 October.

sunset scene

We worked into the sunset at this site.

Then Hurricane Michael hit the Florida panhandle, so we went there to see how we could help.

mom helps kid

Scene at a rest stop on our way to Florida, 12 October.

bent steel beam

Storm damage in Panama City, Florida. This beam used to hold up a billboard.

I didn’t stay very long in Florida. We still have a team working there.

When I returned I decided to take my bike on the light rail north towards Folsom, do my grocery shopping at the Winco there, then ride back home through the American River Parkway. These photos are from the second week I made that trip.

buckeye

A mysterious tree near Folsom, American River Parkway.

buckeye fruit

The buckeye produces a large nut which is unfortunately inedible.

river confluence

View from bike trail where the American River flows into the Sacramento.

bike trail near old Sac

Trail / walkway between the American River Parkway and downtown Sacramento is squeezed in between roads and the river bank.

dia de los muertos

Stage decorations at a Dia De Los Muertos celebration in Old Sacramento (3 November).

ice rink

A winter-season ice rink adds some enjoyment to downtown life.

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Bike Trip East

12 October 2017

I took this trip on the 24th of September. Got busy and almost forgot to write about it!

yellow asters

These hardy yellow asters thrive in an otherwise very dry landscape.

I have taken the American River Bikeway (also known by other names) west into Sacramento many times, but never east, so that’s what I decided to do one recent Sunday.

wild growing grapes

Here is another plant that grows in dry areas. But the fruit needs shade.

I have already written about the plants that grow along the river, but I never tire of photographing them – always hoping for a better shot than the last one. The jimsonweed with its huge white whorled flowers is always interesting to take pictures of.

jimsonweed

The trail east (towards Folsom) goes through drier land than that found downriver. And at one point the soil becomes almost 100 percent large gravel. This is a deposit from an ancient glacier, as far as geologists can tell. The stones are very worn and rounded. You will see these boulders in gardens; there is so much of it around here.

There is also an area of cliffs upriver. I took some pictures, but they didn’t seem very exciting and I didn’t really want to go on about geology, as it’s not my subject. There are also some really fancy houses up on top of those cliffs (other side of river). The views from up there must be pretty darned good.

Meanwhile, down on the trail a little group riding horses pass by. Horses are allowed along most of this trail, but they have their own paths they are supposed to follow, so they won’t interfere too much with the bike riders. These paths weave in and out along the river bank, sometimes using the bike path shoulder. This time of year you can often tell if there are horses ahead because their passing stirs up dust.

horse riders

Egret

egret by the trail

About a week before I made this trip, I saw a very large bird – probably a blue heron – land on the roof of a nearby house. It reminded me of seeing large birds following the creeks of Pullman down to wintering grounds closer to the big rivers, where it stays warmer and the water doesn’t freeze over.

But the fish eaters in this region don’t need to migrate. It never freezes here. Yet these birds do move around, and I am sure they are joined by more birds that summer at higher elevations were it does freeze in the winter. So there was one, one day, standing on a rooftop in Sacramento.

And then on this trip I saw this bird, an egret, by the trail. Myself and another photographer got pretty close to it before it took off. She had a fast camera and said she got a picture of it flying. It is really quite a large bird so seeing it in flight close to the ground is quite dramatic. My attempt to photograph it in flight captured only blue sky.

Lilacs

An another subject, there is the question of the “California Lilac.” Someone decided to call a bushy tree that somewhat resembles the traditional Lilac of the northwest, midwest and east coast by this name. The Lilac we are used to in “temperate” areas originates in the Mediterranean region (or Asia) and is in the Olive Family and rather closely related to the Privet (which does grow in the Sacramento area).

northern lilac flowers

Real lilacs are in genus Syringa

However, the plant found in drier climates named after the Lilac is in the Buckthorn Family, which has a somewhat unusual flower structure. Many of these species are native to California and are seen all over the place, including in many yards and urban plantings. They can be white, pink, violet (purple). A have seen plants that seemed to have totally red flowers, but those were perhaps a different plant, as Ceanothus flower colors apparently don’t include red. In gardens they do appear much like traditional Lilacs. However, the larger plants remind me a lot of mountain-ash (rowan). This particular specimen was hanging over a fence and getting dried out, but the shot shows its flower very well, with its showy frilled petals seated atop rather long slender stems. This plant was probably bred to have flowers this showy.

california lilac flower

California “lilac” is in genus Ceanothus.