Have you read Mission Earth?

Mission Earth is a story written by LRH in 1985, and subsequently published in ten books, spaced out so audiences had time to finish each one before the next one went on sale.

I owned a full set at one time, but only read the first 5 volumes. More recently I purchased the audio books version and finished the story that way. Here is a rather off-the-cuff sum-up of what I took away from reading these books.

A time of unrest in the alternative realities community

The alternative realities community is in a state of considerable upset over predictions scheduled for this year as well as actual events that are occurring, such as the murder of LaVoy Finnicum by the FBI in Oregon, blaming mutant babies on a virus instead of vaccinations all the mothers received, presidential campaigning in the United States, and extreme violence abroad.

Predictions include anything from another – and more severe – financial crisis up to and including the total destruction of Earth as we know it.

Hubbard addresses all these issues in Mission Earth.

My personal opinion is that LRH wrote Mission Earth for the Sea Org and didn’t particularly care if anyone else read it. Sea Org members would understand it. However, the Sea Org wanted to get it on the charts, and marketed it with enthusiasm, as they do with all LRH titles.

I have no idea how many people have actually read it. On the internet, almost everyone pretends that they’ve never read anything by LRH, or if they did, didn’t understand it. And it goes without saying that ordinary book reviewers are not going to credit LRH with being a researcher who possibly had something of value to bring to the table, via this story.

Viewpoints

The first 8 volumes of the story are narrated by the hero’s chief antagonist, a spy from another planet. First viewpoint.
It is presented as a transcription of his “confession,” written after he was imprisoned for his misdeeds. A robotic translator is used in this process, and it makes comments about the illogical nature of the story at the beginning of each book. Second viewpoint.
The spy has secretly installed implants in the hero and the heroine, giving him direct access to their conversations and experiences. Thus we also get the hero’s viewpoint in this story.
The last two volumes are ostensibly penned by an “investigative reporter” from the same planet as the other main characters. He starts out sympathetic with the hero, but gradually gets corrupted by his baser instincts and ends up something close to a raving lunatic. This character gives us the ending of the story, after they have all left Earth and returned to their own planet.

The hero’s viewpoint is very ethical. It is despised by the narrator, a criminal, and that gives us our satire. Though the subject of the books seems to be Earth, it is more correctly the human predicament, which the other planet suffers from as much as Earth does, even though that planet has a continuous written and legal history that goes back tens of thousands of years, and technology very advanced compared to that on Earth.

Hubbard’s hero speaks for Hubbard in terms of ethical and practical answers to a variety of thorny human dilemmas. He briefly explains all sorts of advanced technologies that for all I know are perfectly workable.

The criminal narrator cheers for the unethical side of human thought and experience. He is quite willing to be involved in the most unseemly behavior, particularly involving sexuality, but also murder, and adores the subjects of public relations, psychology and psychiatry, which Hubbard considers three of the most debased subjects on our planet.

Technologies

Here is a short list of technologies mentioned by Hubbard in this story. It is my definite impression that he is telling us that these technologies are quite real and have been used by more advanced civilizations for thousands of years:

  1. Superluminal travel. This is exemplified by a technology he calls the “will-be-was engine.”
  2. Safe biological handlings for pollution. The hero runs a “spore project” to rid Earth of excess pollutants.
  3. Time bending. The hero has a camera-like device which can be dialed up to several hours into the future that he uses to win at roulette in a casino. The royal city on the home planet is also protected by a 13 minute time warp.
  4. Anti-gravity drives, which are quite the ordinary thing on the home planet.
  5. Harnessing of microscopic “proto black holes” as long-term energy sources. The hero does one for earth, and Royal City on the home planet also runs on one.
  6. All sorts of energy-based weapons, of course. Though the criminal’s favorite gun shoots needles.
  7. Mind control via hypnosis. The heroine is expert at this and uses technology called a “hypno-helmet.” The hypnotic effect is well-known on earth, though seldom discussed in “polite” company.

Social dynamics

Hubbard depicts all his characters as fallible. Even the robo-brain in the translatophone. Thus, human societies, to survive, must somehow take this into account.

Both societies suffer from two propensities in particular: drugs and sex. What the hero tries to do with these subjects is to decommercialize them as much as possible so there is no profit in promoting them. This strategy seems to include a minimum of legal prohibitions.

All societies have problems with criminality, and this is really the central theme of this story. Many people, including me, found these books hard to read because criminality is so in your face in this story. The intent, of course, is to get us to face it. A society that cannot face a criminal and deal sternly with one will be overcome by them. This is one of the primary lessons taught by Scientology Ethics and one of the most hardest fought (by the criminals, of course). Criminality has been SO TOLERATED on this planet for so long! Hubbard really makes fun of this fact and its various ramifications. New York City is run by the mob, which does the dirty work for the secret ruler of the planet, Rockefeller (dubbed “Rockecenter” in the story). Everyone has to do what this guy says or else. The mobs, however, have better ethics than the Rockecenters! Some other criminal rackets Hubbard deals with in this story include:

  • Credit card companies and banks.
  • PR as it is commonly practiced on earth.
  • Psychology and psychiatry as they are practiced on earth.
  • The program to make homosexuality popular, as a population control strategy.
  • Rampant spying by the government on private citizens.

Hubbard’s interim answer to social ills is to face and handle the criminal very sternly. This should be the focus of law and the primary duty of the central government. We are talking about real criminals, not all the people who make mistakes. The real ones do it with a passion. The others feel upset about their misdeeds.

On Earth the criminal “Rockecenter” is forced to sign over all his operations to honest people. Then when he attempts a predictable double-cross, he gets blown up, and all the signed papers recovered.

On the home planet, the criminals get exiled to barren regions with “lots of space.” This is Hubbard’s preferred method for handling psychopaths. They cannot be rehabilitated and in any case are not seen as worth the effort. Perhaps the next lifetime will be a better one. On the home planet people live for 200 years or more, so imprisonment of criminals (but in a big open area) until death can give a society a nice long breather.

Earth versus ET

LRH was not happy about what he learned about “advanced” ET civilizations during the course of his researches. And he portrays them with only slightly less asperity than he portrays Earth.

In this story, the hero’s home planet is planning to invade earth and take it over about 150 years in the future. However, surveys have indicated that the planet may not survive that long. The hero is given a royal order to go “fix up” Earth so it will survive longer. The covert operations office (Coordinated Information Apparatus – CIA) is put in charge of all the logistics for this mission, but has gone corrupt, and is using Earth to grow drugs that it imports to the home planet to use in undermining the power of the royal Lords. So the operative assigned to the mission is given a secret order to prevent the hero from being successful.

The alternative realities community is struggling with similar crossed messages about the intentions of ET. Steven Greer thinks ET is our salvation, and all the evil on Earth comes from Earth. However, since none of the people on Earth come from Earth (according to Hubbard’s research), that argument doesn’t wash with me, nor with many others who have experienced ET first hand.

His last word as an author

Though other LRH stories have been published since Mission Earth, I believe it is the last story he wrote before he left, and thus his “parting shot.” Though some have been offended by the book, I think LRH was very justified in writing it. Ever since he took up the serious subjects of Dianetics and Scientology he has been badgered and reviled in “popular” media, yet anyone who has studied these subjects knows how hard he worked on them and understands what a gift they are to Earth. The general public – but particularly those who hope to mold public opinion – deserve the dark satire communicated in this story. They prefer to remain ignorant, and “fiddle” while Rome burns.

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